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Find resources by subject topic

Mental health problems resources and services

Results 1 - 10 of 61

Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

A suite of 12 resources which includes short films, reports, at a glance summaries and tools on Independent Mental Health Advocacy. The resources aim to raise awareness and understanding of the IMHA role amongst service users and mental health staff; improve access IMHA, help providing an understand what a good service looks like, and how outcomes can be measured. The resources have been produced by the Social Care Institute for Excellence in partnership with The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in Preston.

Fluctuating needs: the Care Act 2014

Part of Care Act 2014

Under the Care Act 2014, assessments should reflect more accurately a comprehensive picture of people's needs - including how they change over time. In this film two people, one with mental health needs, the other with a physical disability, talk about their conditions, assessment, how their needs can fluctuate and the impact this has on the level of care and support they need. The film illustrates how the new requirement aims to recognise people as individuals by endorsing a much-needed degree of flexibility and responsive care, as well as offering valuable support for people with mental health and physical health conditions which may vary over time.

What does a good IMHA service look like?

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

A self-assessment tool which enables IMHA providers to self-assess their service within a clear quality framework and help them understand what a good IMHA service looks like. The tool lists ten indicators with suggested evidence sources for self-assessment. The quality indicators covered are: values, independence, role clarity, co-production, relationships to other forms of advocacy provision, staffing, equality and diversity, accessibility of the service, relationship with mental health services, and monitoring and self-evaluation. A third column allows IMHA providers to rate themselves using red, amber and green traffic lights. Providers can then summarises their key strengths and areas for development.

Making a difference: measuring the impact of independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

An effective Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) service is one that delivers good outcomes for the person (sometimes called the 'advocacy partner' or 'partner') receiving the advocacy support. This report looks at the difference that IMHA services can make to the lives of people subject to compulsion under the Mental Health Act 1983. It provides service users, IMHA providers, commissioners and mental health services with information to discuss outcomes, what they are, how they will know they have been achieved, what performance indicators can be used to measure the effectiveness of services, and how outcomes can be measured.

Improving access to Independent Mental Health Advocacy for providers of mental health services

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

The majority of patients detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 are eligible, under section 130 of the 2007 Act, to access Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services. However research has shown that less than half of those qualifying for an IMHA appear to be accessing them. This summary and flowchart provide the essential information needed to implement an open access policy. Open access means qualifying patients are automatically referred to IMHA services unless they object. This approach has implications for IMHA service capacity; resourcing; consent and confidentiality. This summary of how to implement an open access process for IMHA services should be considered in conjunction with the Improving Open Access to IMHA flowchart.

10 top tips for commissioners: commissioning Independent Mental Health Advocacy services in England

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

This briefing provides 10 top tips designed to help commissioners to provide good quality Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA) services. The tips cover: understanding the role and responsibilities of IMHA; co-production; strategic needs assessment and asset mapping; outcome-based commissioning, quality and cost; meeting diverse needs; engaging with IMHA providers; IMHA and other forms of advocacy; non-instructed advocacy; out of area placements; and links with health service commissioners.

Improving equality of access to Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA): a briefing for providers

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

This summary aims to help Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) providers to open up their service to everyone who has the right to use it. Ensuring equalities within IMHA services means reaching all qualifying patients regardless of their ethnicity, age, gender, disability, beliefs, sexual orientation or any other characteristics protected by the 2010 Equalities Act. It also means taking these characteristics into careful account and developing a service that can understand their impact and meet people's needs in the best possible way.

Improving equality of access to Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA): a report for providers

Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

This report aims to help Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services reach everyone who is entitled to their support. It aims to help IMHA providers to achieve the best possible outcomes for all people treated under the Mental Health Act 1983 amended in 2007. Drawing directly on the findings and recommendations of the national review of the quality of IMHA services in England, the report highlights the problem of unequal uptake of IMHA by some groups of ‘qualifying patients' and explores what can be done to change this situation. It highlights the obligations of IMHA services under the Equality Act (2010) and provides concrete suggestions about how to take effective action and improve practice when working with people sharing relevant protected characteristics. It also suggest steps that IMHA providers can take to help them identify, understand, and address the barriers to the full and effective use of their service by everyone who is entitled to access it.

Results 1 - 10 of 61

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