SCIE press release

New reablement resources; eLearning and Guide

15 May 2013

Two new resources, published today, will support the delivery of reablement care and support services. Reablement helps people to learn or re-learn the skills necessary for daily living; it can support people to have a better quality of life, whilst being cost-effective for health and social care services. A new Guide will help care staff and their managers to maximise reablement's potential, and new eLearning modules will support workers and their managers who use reablement in their daily work.

The new resources come from the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). They are based on research and practice evidence about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of reablement. Reablement improves outcomes, restores people's ability to perform usual activities and can improve their perceived quality of life. On evidence to date, there is a high probability that reablement is cost-effective. Although the guide is aimed at commissioners and providers, it highlights the important role a person's family and friends can play in the success or failure of reablement.

SCIE's Chief Executive, Andrea Sutcliffe, says:

Reablement is all about helping people to take back control of their lives - supporting them to learn or re-learn the skills necessary for daily living and building their confidence. We know the really positive difference this can make for individuals. To be successful we need a system that works well, skilled staff and a shared understanding of the benefits, with people using services and their carers. This is where SCIE's new resources come in. I hope that our reablement guide and e-learning resources will be widely used to support managers in putting the necessary services in place; to strengthen the confidence of staff in providing those services; and to secure a broader understanding of the benefits reablement can bring.

The Guide

The Reablement Guide has nine sections, looking at areas such as "culture change"; that is, how all professionals need to challenge the way they have always worked, in order to deliver reablement. Another section looks at reablement and dementia; another focuses on how to end a period of reablement, so that the person is able to be as actively involved in their community as possible.

The eLearning

There is one module for managers and one for care staff, and both modules will support those who use reablement as part of their jobs. There are interactive buttons, exercises and even an interactive map to show where, geographically, reablement is currently being delivered. There is multi-media, with people like Zena telling you about their experiences of receiving reablement. Managers can do things like measure the success of reablement; care staff can study reablement in practice, among other activities.

What is reablement?

Reablement is usually designed to help people learn or re-learn the skills necessary for daily living. Those skills may have been lost through deterioration in health or increasing support needs. Reablement is usually a six to 12 week intervention, focussing on skills such as washing, dressing, cooking and climbing stairs. It is distinguished from conventional home care by using a more "hands off approach" to supporting people. Instead of doing things for people, care workers need to stand back and encourage them to re-learn the ability to do things for themselves. Reablement should not be limited to a focus on regaining physical independence but should also address people's broader social and psychological needs, to build their overall confidence and maximise their quality of life.

SCIE say that reablement should not be limited to a focus on solely regaining physical independence. It should also address people's broader social and psychological needs, to build their overall confidence and maximise their quality of life.

Links

Media contact

Steve Palmer | Press and Public Affairs Manager | Tel: 020 7766 7419 | Mob: 07739 458 192 | Email: media@scie.org.uk