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Results for 'Care Act 2014'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

Prevention in action: the extent to which English local authorities and health and wellbeing boards recognise and prioritise prevention, as defined within the Care Act (2014)

FIELD Olivia, CARTER Chloe

Explores the extent to which local authorities and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention. The study reviewed joint health and wellbeing strategies for the third year in a row, and made a Freedom of Information (FOI) request of all English local authorities to examine whether, and in which context, prevention was mentioned in the HWBs relevant documentation and how local authorities were implementing Section 2 of the Care Act. The Freedom of Information (FOI) responses indicate that local authorities are engaging with the Care Act’s triple definition of prevention, but this terminology has yet to be embraced by health and wellbeing boards. Both the FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategy review indicate that prevention is a key consideration in local decision making, including commissioning. However, while the review of joint health and wellbeing strategies indicates an improved understanding of prevention, tertiary types of prevention are still not being emphasised as much as primary and secondary prevention. In some cases, they are forgotten altogether. Many health and wellbeing boards are yet to place importance on preventative measures that could stop the deterioration or reoccurrence of a health or social care-related crisis by providing lower-level support. FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategies also emphasise the practical difficulties of shifting resources away from crisis intervention to prevention, especially in the current economic climate.

The role of housing in adult safeguarding

CASS Elaine

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of housing in adult safeguarding under the Care Act (2014) in England. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a summary of the implications for housing organisations and their staff of adult safeguarding under the Care Act. The implications, underpinned by the six safeguarding principles, are explained within a summary of the legal and practice framework for safeguarding in England. Findings: The paper draws upon research by Imogen Parry (2014). It argues that past failings in adult safeguarding in England have placed it high on the housing agenda and that housing has a key role to play in adult safeguarding. Practical implications: Housing organisations need to be proactive partners in local multi-agency arrangements for adult safeguarding. Staff and contractors need to receive training in line with their role to raise awareness of their safeguarding responsibilities. Originality/value: The value of the paper is to increase and maintain awareness of the need for housing engagement in the adult safeguarding agenda.

Response to the regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014: section 2: prevention, reducing or delaying needs


Sets out the response of the Care and Support Alliance to the Government consultation on draft regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014. The response focuses on section 2 which covers prevention, reducing or delaying needs. Overall, the Alliance is pleased with the draft of both the regulations and guidance, but notes areas that could be strengthened and identifies scope to improve the read across to other chapters. Areas covered in the response include the description of prevention used and the examples of preventative services and resources listed in the guidance.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: project report


Summarises the methods and approach, discusses the learning and shares knowledge arising from the ‘Assessing social care market and provider sustainability’ project, which has developed guidance and a toolkit for the Department of Health, the Local Government Association, and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. These resources are designed to support implementation of the Care Act 2014 and help local authorities fulfil their responsibilities in the event of a care provider failure.

Care Act: assessment and eligibility: strengths-based approaches


This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

The Care Act 2014 and its statutory guidance: briefing for the housing support sector


This briefing summarises the implications of the Care Act and its statutory guidance for commissioners and providers of Home Improvement Agency services in England in relation to housing and adaptations. It looks particularly at the role of housing related services to help in preventing or delaying demand for larger packages of care and support and help in integrating the whole system. Sections cover: prevention; advice and information; integration; assessments and eligibility criteria.

Care Act 2014: a strengths-based approach


One of the aims of the Care Act 2014 is to promote people's wellbeing and independence. By using a strengths-based approach to the assessment process, people can be supported to understand their needs, realise what they can do, and how to best use their skills and networks, to achieve their outcomes. This film looks at what is meant by a strengths-based approach and how practitioners through the assessment process can enable people to be at the centre of their own care and support needs.

Results 1 - 7 of 7