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Results for 'Health and Wellbeing Boards'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Prevention in action: the extent to which English local authorities and health and wellbeing boards recognise and prioritise prevention, as defined within the Care Act (2014)

FIELD Olivia, CARTER Chloe

Explores the extent to which local authorities and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention. The study reviewed joint health and wellbeing strategies for the third year in a row, and made a Freedom of Information (FOI) request of all English local authorities to examine whether, and in which context, prevention was mentioned in the HWBs relevant documentation and how local authorities were implementing Section 2 of the Care Act. The Freedom of Information (FOI) responses indicate that local authorities are engaging with the Care Act’s triple definition of prevention, but this terminology has yet to be embraced by health and wellbeing boards. Both the FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategy review indicate that prevention is a key consideration in local decision making, including commissioning. However, while the review of joint health and wellbeing strategies indicates an improved understanding of prevention, tertiary types of prevention are still not being emphasised as much as primary and secondary prevention. In some cases, they are forgotten altogether. Many health and wellbeing boards are yet to place importance on preventative measures that could stop the deterioration or reoccurrence of a health or social care-related crisis by providing lower-level support. FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategies also emphasise the practical difficulties of shifting resources away from crisis intervention to prevention, especially in the current economic climate.

The force begins to awaken: a third review of the state of health and wellbeing boards

SHARED INTELLIGENCE

An evaluation of the current position of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs), which seeks to identify features and factors that influence whether or not a board makes significant progress. The report draws on information from interviews with 23 local and national stakeholders involved with HWBs; a workshop with people doing bespoke work with boards on behalf of the Local Government Association; observation of and a focus group discussion at a HWB leadership essentials course; and a review of eight health and wellbeing peer challenges. The report identifies a number of factors which have a significant influence on the effectiveness of a HWB. Factors identified are: committed leadership; a history of collaboration between health and social care; clarity of purpose; a geography that works; the response to austerity; a focus on place; a director of public health who understands the role of HWB; high quality day-to-day support; changes in board membership and leadership; and good basic housekeeping to enable effective leadership. The final section of the report summarises key actions and areas to address if boards are to be more effective. The report concludes that a small but significant number of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) are now beginning to play a genuine leadership role across the local health and care system. It finds that boards are considerably more effective than they were a year ago and a number of other boards are on the cusp of making that shift. Most boards are doing useful work, but their potential remains unfulfilled.

Making it better together: a call to action on the future of health and wellbeing boards

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

This publication is a call to action to local commissioners, Government and national bodies to support health and wellbeing boards in bringing about a radical transformation in the health of local communities. It has been prepared by the Local Government Association (LGA) and NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) working jointly in consultation with members of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) across the country. Among the essential characteristics of effective place-based boards this document highlights: shared leadership; a strategic approach; engaging with communities; and collaborative ways of working. It proposes: a national five-year funding settlement across health and care; freedom for HWBs to determine local priorities; development of a new payment system; enhanced information governance and data sharing; commitment to the principle of subsidiarity in commissioning decisions; a single national outcomes framework for health, public health and social care; and a national strategy for coordinated workforce planning and integrated workforce development across health, public health and social care.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Developing the power of strong, inclusive communities

MILLER Clive, WILTON Catherine

Sets out a strategy, which can be adapted locally, for how health and wellbeing boards can fulfil new wellbeing and prevention duties under the Care Act. The framework supports the development of strong and inclusive communities and indicates how people, communities and services can more effectively and efficiently work together to co-produce outcomes. The framework incorporates key areas of action for the health and wellbeing boards, which include: keep people at the centre and focus on their outcomes; focus on both assets and needs; focus on all levels of prevention; rethink integration; target people with two or more long term conditions; work through universal service providers; enable community and cross-sector systems leadership; develop a new approach to health and wellbeing strategies; and adopt a collaborative approach to priority setting and savings. The framework has been trialled with a number of trailblazer health and wellbeing boards each of whom refined and adapted it to reflect local circumstances.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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