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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'NHS'

Results 1 - 9 of 9

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

Public health’s role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Making a case for information: full report

TREADGOLD Paul, GRANT Carol

This research report highlights how providing information to patients and their carers improves outcomes, reduces costs and gives people a better experience of care. Consumer health information (CHI) is defined as information and support provided to help patients and carers understand, manage and/or make decisions about their health, condition or treatment. High quality means effective information, which meets the needs of users and empowers them to make choices and take control of their health and wellbeing. The Patient Information Forum (PiF) commissioned research to identify the benefits of investing in health information. The project, which looked at over 300 studies, found that there are good business reasons to justify the investment of more time, money and training in health information provision and support. These include positive impacts on service use and costs, substantial capacity savings, and significant returns on investment by increasing shared decision-making, self-care and the self-management of long-term conditions.

Evaluating integrated and community-based care: how do we know it works?

BARDSLEY Martin, et al

Over the last five years the Nuffield Trust has undertaken evaluations of over 30 different community-based interventions. In many cases the authors have been tasked with identifying whether service changes have led to a reduction in emergency admissions and the associated cost to the NHS. Using these indicators, the results have been almost overwhelmingly negative. The one exception was Marie Curie Nursing Services for terminally ill patients. In this paper the authors outline the main community-based interventions they have evaluated and their impact, and identify nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future. The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013.

Taking stock: assessing the value of preventative support

BRITISH RED CROSS

The aim of this report is to illustrate how British Red Cross preventative services providing time-limited practical and emotional support deliver savings for public sector partners including the NHS and local authorities. It presents brief case studies of 5 people who received personalised support from British Red Cross staff and volunteers to help them live independently in their communities. In each case it describes the action taken and the impact of the services and support provided. It includes an independent economic analysis of each case study assessing the costs which could have been incurred by statutory services in delivering care in the absence of the British Red Cross services. It reports that savings of between £700 and over £10,000 were delivered per person, and that this reflects a minimum return on investment of over 3.5 times the cost of the British Red Cross service provided.

Results 1 - 9 of 9

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