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Results for 'co-production'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Framework for patient and public participation in primary care commissioning


A guide for primary care commissioners in NHS England and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) on how to involve patients, service users, carers and the public in the commissioning of primary care services. This includes involving throughout the commissioning process in the planning, policy making, buying and monitoring primary care services such as general practice, community pharmacy, dental, and eye health services. The Framework looks at how NHS England involves people in commissioning at national and local levels; co-commissoning with CCGs; and individual responsibilities as a policy or commissioning manager in primary care. It also includes short case study examples, provides details of additional sources of information, and key partner organisations and networks with an interest in public participation. It has been co-designed with members of the Working Group for Patient and Public Participation in Primary Care Commissioning and also incorporates feedback received from key stakeholders. The document will also be of interest to patients and the public, the voluntary sector, and providers of health and social care services. It is designed to be read with the NHS England Patient and Public Participation Policy and the Statement of Arrangements and Guidance on Patient and Public Participation in Commissioning.

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector


This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Mental health and housing


This study examines how different types of supported accommodation meet the needs of people with mental health problems. Supported accommodation covers a wide range of different types of housing, including intensive 24 hour support, hostel accommodation, and accommodation with only occasional social support or assistance provided. The document focuses on five approaches to providing supported accommodation, including: Care Support Plus; integrated support; housing support for people who have experienced homeless; complex needs; low-level step down accommodation; and later life. The report draws on the expertise of people living and working in these services across England, and presents their views of both building and service related issues. It sets out a number of recommendations, focusing on: quality; co-production; staff recruitment and training; policy informed practice; and resourced, appropriate accommodation.

Local early action: how to make it happen

COOTE Anna, BUA Adrian

Reports on the work of the Southwark and Lambeth Early Action Commission which was set up to explore ways of taking local early action and preventative measures to improve people’s quality of life and reduce pressure on public services. The Commission carried out a review of local strategy, policy and practice; explored more than 30 examples of good practice in the two boroughs and further afield; and engaged with local residents and community-based groups and with other experts, through workshops and interviews. The Commission found the underlying causes of most social problems could be traced to the same social and economic challenges. Although some of these challenges, such as poverty and inequality were linked to national policy, making it hard to tackle them locally areas were identified where local early action could be effective in prevent problems. The Commission identified four goals for early action in Southwark and Lambeth: developing resourceful communities, where residents and groups act as agents of change; preventative places, where the quality of neighbourhoods has a positive impact on how people feel and enables them to help themselves and each other; strong partnerships between organisations; and where local institutions support early action. Case studies of good practice to support the report’s recommendations for prevention and early action are included.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care


A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Building contingent capacity: shifting power in organisations to become more responsive to the people they serve

KAUR-STUBBS Sukhvinder

This paper sets out research to understand and work within the emerging landscape in which organisations find that the people they serve acquire greater prominence among their multiple stakeholders and power gradients have to adjust accordingly. Respect for the dignity of people and how organisations respond to their needs, wishes, gifts and aspirations are becoming pivotal. Drawing on a survey and participation of 20 sector leaders at a roundtable hosted by the University of Birmingham and funded by the Barrow Cadbury Trust, the research proposes a framework for organisations to review and, if necessary, restate the priority given to people (commonly called users), develop practice that encourages reciprocity in the design and delivery of products and services, and establish processes that are pervious and accountable to people and their networks. At the core of the framework is the concept of contingent capacity. Contingent capacity is purposeful, distributive and empowers workers (staff and volunteers), to listen to and respect people and, inspire their participation. The approach comprises three stages, which include: Purpose and Power – against a backdrop of more assertive citizens and a changing socio-economic environment, reviewing how the organisation continues to respect the dignity of the people it serves and ensures they are able to contribute to decisions that affect them; Reciprocal Engagement – recalibrating practice and culture to give greater priority to people and encourage deep and iterative engagement; and Outcome Plus – ensuring processes optimise value, not just to the organisation but, also, to the people and the wider communities around them.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England


This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing


A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organisations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports


This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Results 1 - 10 of 14