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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'counselling'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

Psychological Support Service

Age UK Warwickshire

Age UK Warwickshire’s Psychological Support Services provide a range of interventions aimed at improving wellbeing and supporting older people across the county. This includes ‘Support, Time and Recovery’ (STR), a service aimed at improving the wellbeing, increasing the self-management and preventing the isolation, of adults aged over 55 diagnosed with depression, anxiety or stress.

How psychological telehealth can alleviate society's mental health burden: a literature review


The authors believe that with the current and growing prevalence of mental illness a major shift and expansion of clinical practice must occur to overcome the mental health burden and facilitate positive change. This article offers an outline of, and case for, incorporating telehealth in mental health practice. For the purposes of this review, telehealth specifically refers to synchronous web camera-based interventions. Novel options, including mHealth (mobile) and the use of computer tablets, are discussed. The implications for practice including training are considered, as well as potential future directions for the field. It is concluded that the available data supports telehealth as an effective mode for the treatment of clients who are unable to pursue mental health services as they are available. It appears that with careful planning, telehealth systems can significantly impact the quality, timeliness, and availability of services in almost any mental health care system. The authors emphasise that the goal is not to substitute for a “real” person but to integrate telehealth into overall provision. In some cases a consistent face-to-face interaction may be the best care but this may not always be possible. The authors conclude by emphasising the importance of appropriate training for the mental health professionals if telehealth is to be effectively.

Results 1 - 3 of 3