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Results for 'emergency services'

Results 1 - 2 of 2

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public’s health


The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Evaluating integrated and community-based care: how do we know it works?

BARDSLEY Martin, et al

Over the last five years the Nuffield Trust has undertaken evaluations of over 30 different community-based interventions. In many cases the authors have been tasked with identifying whether service changes have led to a reduction in emergency admissions and the associated cost to the NHS. Using these indicators, the results have been almost overwhelmingly negative. The one exception was Marie Curie Nursing Services for terminally ill patients. In this paper the authors outline the main community-based interventions they have evaluated and their impact, and identify nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future. The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013.

Results 1 - 2 of 2