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Results for 'equal opportunities'

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Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future


In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

Guidance for commissioners of mental health services for people from black and minority ethnic communities


This guide describes what ‘good’ mental health services for people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities look like. While all of the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health commissioning guides apply to all communities, there are good reasons why additional guidance is required on commissioning mental health services for people from BME communities. The document sets out the key priorities that should guide the commissioning of mental health services for BME groups. These include: supporting equitable access to effective interventions, and equitable experiences and outcomes; identifying and implementing specific measures to reduce ethnic inequalities in mental health; developing local strategies and plans for improving mental health and wellbeing amongst BME communities; making targeted investments in public mental health interventions for BME communities; involving service users, carers as well as members of local BME communities in the commissioning process; collecting, analysing, reporting, and acting upon data about ethnicity, service use, and outcomes; creating more accessible, broader, and flexible care pathways, and integrating services across the voluntary, community, social care and health sectors; ensuring every mental health service are culturally capable and able to address the diverse needs of a multi-cultural population through effective and appropriate forms of assessment and interventions; developing a number of strategies to reduce coercive care, which is experienced disproportionately by some BME groups. This guide focuses on services for working age adults. However, it could also be interpreted for commissioning specialist mental health services, such as CAMHS, secure psychiatric care, and services for older adults. It includes case-examples derived from an online survey of various BME stakeholder groups on the issue of quality in BME service provision

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