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Results for 'good practice'

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Public health’s role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE

This practice guideline covers approaches to involving local communities as a way of promoting health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities. Recommendations cover: developing collaboration and partnership approaches encourage alliances between community members and statutory, community and voluntary organisations to meet local needs and priorities; involving people in peer and lay roles to represent local needs and priorities; local approaches to making community engagement an integral part of health and wellbeing initiatives; and making it as easy as possible for people to get involved. The guideline also makes recommendations for future research which include research on effectiveness and cost effectiveness; frameworks to evaluate the impact of community engagement; aspects of collaborations and partnerships that lead to improved health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of social media for improving health and wellbeing. The guideline updates and replaces NICE guideline PH9 (published February 2008).

Local early action: how to make it happen

COOTE Anna, BUA Adrian

Reports on the work of the Southwark and Lambeth Early Action Commission which was set up to explore ways of taking local early action and preventative measures to improve people’s quality of life and reduce pressure on public services. The Commission carried out a review of local strategy, policy and practice; explored more than 30 examples of good practice in the two boroughs and further afield; and engaged with local residents and community-based groups and with other experts, through workshops and interviews. The Commission found the underlying causes of most social problems could be traced to the same social and economic challenges. Although some of these challenges, such as poverty and inequality were linked to national policy, making it hard to tackle them locally areas were identified where local early action could be effective in prevent problems. The Commission identified four goals for early action in Southwark and Lambeth: developing resourceful communities, where residents and groups act as agents of change; preventative places, where the quality of neighbourhoods has a positive impact on how people feel and enables them to help themselves and each other; strong partnerships between organisations; and where local institutions support early action. Case studies of good practice to support the report’s recommendations for prevention and early action are included.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

LGA Adult social care efficiency programme: the final report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

This is the concluding report from the LGA Adult Social Care Efficiency (ASCE) programme. The programme was launched in 2011 in response to the significant cuts to council budgets and their impact on adult social care. The aim of the programme is to support councils to develop transformational approaches to making the efficiency savings required to meet the challenge of reduced funding. The report shares innovative and transformational examples of how councils are bringing together businesses, public sector partners and communities to develop lower-cost solutions to support the most vulnerable in our society. In particular, it outlines some key lessons around developing a new contract with citizens and communities, managing demand, transformation, commissioning, procurement and contract management, and integration. It looks at efficiency approaches in practice, with specific reference to assessment, advice and information, delivering preventative services, avoiding admissions and reducing costs of residential care, reducing costs in domiciliary care and transforming learning disability services. In addition, it considers local approaches to developing effective internal management, reshaping the service and working with partners, customers and suppliers.

Guidance for commissioners of mental health services for people from black and minority ethnic communities

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH

This guide describes what ‘good’ mental health services for people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities look like. While all of the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health commissioning guides apply to all communities, there are good reasons why additional guidance is required on commissioning mental health services for people from BME communities. The document sets out the key priorities that should guide the commissioning of mental health services for BME groups. These include: supporting equitable access to effective interventions, and equitable experiences and outcomes; identifying and implementing specific measures to reduce ethnic inequalities in mental health; developing local strategies and plans for improving mental health and wellbeing amongst BME communities; making targeted investments in public mental health interventions for BME communities; involving service users, carers as well as members of local BME communities in the commissioning process; collecting, analysing, reporting, and acting upon data about ethnicity, service use, and outcomes; creating more accessible, broader, and flexible care pathways, and integrating services across the voluntary, community, social care and health sectors; ensuring every mental health service are culturally capable and able to address the diverse needs of a multi-cultural population through effective and appropriate forms of assessment and interventions; developing a number of strategies to reduce coercive care, which is experienced disproportionately by some BME groups. This guide focuses on services for working age adults. However, it could also be interpreted for commissioning specialist mental health services, such as CAMHS, secure psychiatric care, and services for older adults. It includes case-examples derived from an online survey of various BME stakeholder groups on the issue of quality in BME service provision

Results 1 - 10 of 12

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