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Results for 'hospitals'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Digital reablement: a personalised service to reduce admissions and readmissions to hospitals and nursing homes

DOUGHTY Kevin, MULVIHILL Patrick

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of digital healthcare through telecare and portable assistive devices in supporting the reengineering of healthcare to deal with the needs of an older and more vulnerable population wishing to remain in their own homes. Design/methodology/approach: It supports the importance of the assessment process to identify hazards associated with independent living, and the possible consequences of accidents. By measuring and prioritising the risks, appropriate management strategies may be introduced to provide a safer home environment. Findings: A process for assessing and managing these risks has been developed. This can be applied to a wide range of different cases and yields solutions that can support independence. Research limitations/implications: The developed digital reablement process can be used to provide vulnerable people with a robust form of risk management. Practical implications: If telecare services follow the process described in this paper then they will improve the outcomes for their users. Originality/value: The process described in this paper is the first attempt to produce a robust assessment process for introducing telecare services in a reablement context.

Well-being through design: transferability of design concepts for healthcare environments to ordinary community settings

BOEX Will, BOEX Sam

The concept of well-being is now well established, both in ordinary language and in UK Government policy. There is now a growing interest in looking at the effects on environmental design on well-being. The aim of this paper is to explore current interest in the concept of well-being, and to trace the growing use of design ideas in healthcare settings to reduce stress and maximise efficiency. The potential in this approach is illustrated with some examples of design approaches applied in healthcare. The patient journey through the healthcare setting is considered in terms of ‘touch points’ such as the car park, the entrance, corridors, and the work area. These design concepts and approaches seem also to promise similar benefits in community settings where issues in managing the health and well-being of vulnerable individuals are equally relevant. They may be especially useful in current efforts towards creating dementia-friendly homes and communities, or ‘psychologically informed environments’ in services for marginalised and excluded individuals.

Results 1 - 3 of 3

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