SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.


Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'housing'

Results 11 - 17 of 17

Unleashing the power of digital communications: revolutionising housing with care with life enhancing technologies


This paper looks at how technology can be used to help deliver good housing, care and support. It summarises the results from an online survey and workshop held with the South West Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network) leadership. It looks at what can be achieved when technology is implemented well and the looks at the challenges, barriers to adoption and ways to overcome the barriers. Four main barriers to the deployment of technology emerged from the workshop: culture; awareness; leadership, commissioning and procurement; and budgets. Suggestions put forward to help break down these barriers include: adopting a phased introduction of new ways of working; adopt a range of flexible funding options; good communication with stakeholders which involves them in the process early on; and using technology as one part of an integrated approach. Some case study examples are also presented as a bulleted list.

All our futures: housing for ageing


This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

The Care Act 2014 and its statutory guidance: briefing for the housing support sector


This briefing summarises the implications of the Care Act and its statutory guidance for commissioners and providers of Home Improvement Agency services in England in relation to housing and adaptations. It looks particularly at the role of housing related services to help in preventing or delaying demand for larger packages of care and support and help in integrating the whole system. Sections cover: prevention; advice and information; integration; assessments and eligibility criteria.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people


Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health


Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Improving later life: services for older people: what works


This report presents jargon-free summaries of research on key aspects of services for older people, each written by experts in their field. It also draws out seven major themes from the research covering service design, the role of carers, the need for regular assessment, and the importance of social interaction. Contributors cover the following areas: service cost-effectiveness, what works in integrating health and care, dignity of older service users, safeguarding, supporting older people and their carers, council managed personal budgets, paying for social care, involving older people in evaluation and research, preventing isolation and loneliness, promoting inclusion in rural communities, housing with care, home telecare, supporting older people in the community, services for men, falls prevention, assistive technology for people with dementia, cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia, and memory services.

Pervasive interactions: a purposive best evidence review with methodological observations on the impact of housing circumstances and housing interventions on adult mental health and well-being


There is a widespread view, derived primarily from the lived experience of mental health service staff and service users, that housing has a significant impact on mental health. The aim of this purposive review is to describe the current state of evidence on the effect of housing circumstances, and housing-related interventions, on adult mental health and well-being. The review covers the entire range of health from chronic illness to positive thriving, and both individual and community-level/public health. It gives priority to research relevant to public policy considerations, in particular to the UK context.  The complexity of methodological issues emerges as a key challenge for research in this field, and for the prospect of evidence-based national policy. The limited available evidence gives conditional support to: policies accentuating empowerment at individual and community levels; early intervention; locality or place-based interventions; and integrated working practice.

Results 11 - 17 of 17