#EXCLUDE#

SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.

#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'independence'

Results 1 - 10 of 15

The future of loneliness: facing the challenge of loneliness: facing the challenge of loneliness for older people in the UK, 2014 to 2030

FUTURE FOUNDATION

This report, commissioned by Friends of the Elderly, looks at the key factors likely to shape the future of older-age loneliness in the UK over the next 15 years. It identifies the challenges and opportunities in reducing loneliness and highlights possible interventions and preventative measures. The report draws on existing research resources, in-depth interviews with six older people who lived alone, and data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and Government Actuaries' Department forecasts on age, marital status and partnership status. Areas discussed include: the implications of demographic change; wealth and work; leisure and social life; family and friends; the use of new technologies for contact and communication; and independence and connectedness at home. Key findings include: a connection between low contact with family members and loneliness, a link between poverty and loneliness; and the potential of technology to reduce loneliness.

Call and Check

Jersey Post

Call and Check is a Jersey based initiative which uses the delivery platform of the postal service to support people to live independently in their own homes. Postal workers are trained to make short visits to residents which involve conversations covering health and social wellbeing topics. The service links residents with health social care and voluntary sector providers whilst also preventing social isolation.

What role can local and national supportive services play in supporting independent and healthy living in individuals 65 and over?

WINDLE Karen

This report explores the evidence base around effective and cost-effective preventative services and the role that they can play in supporting older people’s independence, health and wellbeing. It looks at the available evidence to support the benefits of preventative services in mitigating social inclusion and loneliness and improving physical health. It also highlights evidence on the effectiveness of information, advice and signposting in helping people access preventative services and the benefits of providing practical interventions such as minor housing repairs. It considers a wide range of primary and secondary preventative services, including: health screening, vaccinations, day services, reablement, and care coordination and management. It then outlines two teritary prevention services which aim to prevent imminent admission to acute health settings. These are community based rapid response services and ambulatory emergency care units, which operation within the secondary care environment. The report then highlights gaps in the evidence base and and looks at what is needed to develop preventative services to achieve health and independent ageing by 2013. It looks at the changes needed in service funding and commissioning, the balance between individual responsibility and organisational support, and how preventative services should be implemented.

Report on the DFG summit: hosted by the College of Occupational Therapists and Foundations in December 2015

ASTRAL PUBLIC SERVICES

A summary of the main points raised at the Disabled Facilities Grant summit together with some apposite case studies showing what works well now. Disabled facilities grants are a national housing grant available to adults and children with a disability to facilitate access to and within the property. The grant is available to all owner occupiers, private and housing association tenants subject to a statutory means test. The meeting discussed five key questions about DFGs and their context within the wider theme of people remaining independent in the community, regardless of their means. The questions are: what works well in current practice; how to improve customer service; how to support self-funders; how to collaborate better with other services; and how to redesign services for the future. The document closes with major themes that emerged from the day together with some key recommendations of what can be changed nationally and locally to advance collaborative systems, prevention and DFG regulations.

Prevention in Bexley

London Borough of Bexley

The London Borough of Bexley is currently supporting different groups of people using a prevention approach: promoting citizenship for adults with learning disabilities; following a community-based recovery model in mental health day services and providing an integrated reablement service to enable older people to regain their independence and stay in their homes for longer.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Hospital 2 Home Leicestershire

Royal Voluntary Service

Hospital 2 Home Leicestershire provides low level practical support for people returning home from hospital after illness, surgery or accident. The service aims to ensure people achieve full rehabilitation and regain independence, whilst also enabling quicker discharge from hospital.

Safe and Well

Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council

Safe and Well is the Assistive Technology Programme with which Blackburn and Darwen Borough Council aims to improve the outcomes for its citizens, supporting them to live independently at home, while also reducing its social care costs. It has consisted of 3 pilot projects to date, working with adults with learning and physical disabilities; nursing and residential homes and early intervention with adults not yet eligible for funded social care. Blackburn has moved from supporting 60 people to over 1900 people with assistive technologies.

Tower Hamlets Reablement Service

Tower Hamlets London Borough Council

The London Borough of Tower Hamlets provide a multidisciplinary, short-term Reablement service to all adults over 18 in the borough who may have lost confidence, skills or independence following an accident, ill health, a disability or a stay in hospital. The service aims to enable people to relearn life skills, to rebuild their confidence, to facilitate and consolidate their existing abilities and build on their own resources and to enable and promote a healthy lifestyle that is relevant to the individual. This can lead to a reduction or absence in long-term support needed, thereby reducing long-term costs.

The bigger picture: policy insights and recommendations

LLOYD James

This report evaluates the performance of government policy on care and support of older people who struggle with day-to-day activities in England during the period 2011 to 2013, using the data and insights from ‘The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population’. Part 1 of this report examines the reach of publicly funded support; the unmet need in the older population; and variation and consistency of care and support. Part 2 considers the implications of the Care Act implementation and looks at policy development beyond 2016, focusing on eligible needs after the Act, financial eligibility and the means test after 2016 and mapping, identifying and engaging older population groups. The report concludes that given the feasibility and budget challenges implied by the sheer numbers of older people experiencing difficulties with activities of daily living, a rethink and revolution is required among national and local policymakers around how individuals and families are engaged and supported. This will mean revisiting the balance between consistency and variation in services organised by local authorities, as well as fully integrating and exploiting the different ‘touch points’ and ‘gateways’ available for engaging the older population. It will also mean evaluating which aspects of the vision of the Care Act need to be fulfilled by local authorities directly, or can be devolved to empowered, third-party charities and organisations at a local level.

Results 1 - 10 of 15

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#