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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'informal care'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Social care for marginalised communities: balancing self-organisation, micro-provision and mainstream support

CARR Sarah

This briefing reviews recent research on social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010, who are often seldom heard in mainstream services. It draws out messages for social care micro-providers and social care commissioners, focusing on two areas: the marginalising dynamics in mainstream, statutory social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics; and how local community, specialist or small-scale services are responding to unmet need for support and advice among marginalised groups. The majority of research identified looked at issues and experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, with a large number of studies dedicated to understanding the role of family carers, particularly from South Asian backgrounds. A smaller body of work on lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older people and carers was found. Similarly, a number of research studies on support for and by refugees and asylum seekers were identified. Some research on the role of faith was also found. By comparing research findings across several groups, common issues about engagement with mainstream services and the function of community based and specialist support became apparent. The main themes and messages coming from the research for commissioners and providers focus on: strategies for responding to marginalisation from the mainstream, including assets and community mobilisation, reciprocity and social inclusion, informal networks and self-organisation; accessing and engaging with mainstream provision, highlighting issues of fear of discrimination, uniformity and homogenisation, language and communication; relationship dynamics between large, traditional mainstream and small, specialist community, including capacity building and partnerships, advocacy and accessing mainstream support, choice and voice; understanding informal support in diverse communities, in which a key role is played by culture, stigma and shame, well-being, identity and resilience, and faith; and effective approaches, including emotional and social support, and non-conventional, networked and holistic support.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Prevention is better than cure…

WARD Cally, COOPER Vivien

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective from family carers on the promotion of independence and the prevention of avoidable dependency. Design/methodology/approach: Narrative review and discussion. Findings: Family carers frequently experience their own or their relatives’ needs being met only when they have reached crisis point. A shift to a more preventive approach, delivered in a personalised and family-centred manner, could transform the experiences of people with learning disabilities and their families. Originality/value: Attention is drawn to the importance of strengthening the case for a preventive approach and the role of co-ordinated and strategic leadership in its delivery.

Results 1 - 3 of 3

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