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Results for 'information sharing'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

Lack of communication between children’s and adults’ social care: practice issues from Serious Case Reviews

NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN, SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE

Briefing paper which looks at lack of communication and information sharing between children's and adult's social care in child protection services. It is one of a series 14 briefings looking at difficult issues in inter-professional communication and decision-making identified from 38 Serious Case Reviews, with added information gathered from three multi-agency ‘summits’. Drawing on the analysis of serious care review reports, the briefing highlights the reasons why there can be a lack of communication between adult's social care and children's social care, which include: a lack of understanding of each others roles and of how to work together in order to attain a whole-family assessment. It also provides solutions suggested by summit participants and contains a set of self-assessment questions to support managers and practitioners to tackle similar issues in their own local area.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

Quick guide: improving hospital discharge into the care sector

et al, NHS ENGLAND

This quick guide provides ideas and practical tips to commissioners and providers on how to improve hospital discharge for people with care home places or packages of care at home. The guide identifies areas for improvement, setting out checklist actions for local health economies to consider and examples of practical solutions and links to resources. The areas identified are: culture of collaboration between care sector, NHS and social care; improving communication; clarity on information sharing and information governance; difficulties with achieving the ‘home before lunch’ ambition; assessments undertaken in hospital leading to ‘deconditioning’ and longer, unnecessary hospital stays; delays to discharge due to awaiting for assessment; capacity of community-based services; and patient experience and involvement.

The role of housing in adult safeguarding

CASS Elaine

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of housing in adult safeguarding under the Care Act (2014) in England. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a summary of the implications for housing organisations and their staff of adult safeguarding under the Care Act. The implications, underpinned by the six safeguarding principles, are explained within a summary of the legal and practice framework for safeguarding in England. Findings: The paper draws upon research by Imogen Parry (2014). It argues that past failings in adult safeguarding in England have placed it high on the housing agenda and that housing has a key role to play in adult safeguarding. Practical implications: Housing organisations need to be proactive partners in local multi-agency arrangements for adult safeguarding. Staff and contractors need to receive training in line with their role to raise awareness of their safeguarding responsibilities. Originality/value: The value of the paper is to increase and maintain awareness of the need for housing engagement in the adult safeguarding agenda.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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