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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 1 - 10 of 27

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Public health’s role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

Quick guide: improving hospital discharge into the care sector

et al, NHS ENGLAND

This quick guide provides ideas and practical tips to commissioners and providers on how to improve hospital discharge for people with care home places or packages of care at home. The guide identifies areas for improvement, setting out checklist actions for local health economies to consider and examples of practical solutions and links to resources. The areas identified are: culture of collaboration between care sector, NHS and social care; improving communication; clarity on information sharing and information governance; difficulties with achieving the ‘home before lunch’ ambition; assessments undertaken in hospital leading to ‘deconditioning’ and longer, unnecessary hospital stays; delays to discharge due to awaiting for assessment; capacity of community-based services; and patient experience and involvement.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Making it better together: a call to action on the future of health and wellbeing boards

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

This publication is a call to action to local commissioners, Government and national bodies to support health and wellbeing boards in bringing about a radical transformation in the health of local communities. It has been prepared by the Local Government Association (LGA) and NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) working jointly in consultation with members of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) across the country. Among the essential characteristics of effective place-based boards this document highlights: shared leadership; a strategic approach; engaging with communities; and collaborative ways of working. It proposes: a national five-year funding settlement across health and care; freedom for HWBs to determine local priorities; development of a new payment system; enhanced information governance and data sharing; commitment to the principle of subsidiarity in commissioning decisions; a single national outcomes framework for health, public health and social care; and a national strategy for coordinated workforce planning and integrated workforce development across health, public health and social care.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Results 1 - 10 of 27

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