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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'intervention'

Results 1 - 10 of 47

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

Access to outdoor recreation by older people in Scotland

COLLEY Kathryn, et al

Scottish research study to examine the barriers preventing older people, including older people with long-term health conditions and disabilities, from accessing outdoor recreation opportunities. The research involved two stages: an investigation of the spatial distribution of older people using small-scale geographical units and semi-structured interviews with 27 older people across three case study sites of varying levels of urbanity and access to different types of green/blue natural resources. Results from the spatial distribution analysis found that remote areas and isolated small towns had higher concentrations of older people and older people with health problems or disabilities. It also identifies that the negative impacts on the well-being and resilience of local communities are also likely to be stronger in remote areas, with challenges in accessing medical and care facilities. The case study work found the barriers to participation in outdoor recreation by older people are multiple and inter-related. Key categories of barriers identified in the interviews were: poor health and (im)mobility; lack of or reduced social connections; fragility and vulnerability; lack of motivation and time commitments; safety; and weather and season. Key implications for policy and practice identified from the research include: for interventions to address the multiple and interrelated barriers preventing older people from participating in outdoor recreation, using integrated and holistic approaches involving different organisations; for ‘green prescribing’ by doctors and medical professionals to be integrated with existing initiatives (eg walking groups) which offer opportunities for overcoming social and motivational barriers; and for interventions to identify ways of providing transport access to outdoor spaces to older people.

Evaluation of Prevention Matters

APTELIGEN, et al

An evaluation of Prevention Matters, a whole county change programme designed to facilitate access to frontline community services and groups in Buckinghamshire. The programme targets those whose needs are below the substantial need threshold for adult social care, building on a referral system, rather than on direct support. Fourteen Community Practice Workers (CPWs) are aligned to the seven GP localities in Buckinghamshire, and lead on the referral process, from first contact with the users to final review and exit. The CPWs are supported by seven Community Links Officers who ensure that the necessary resources are available in the community to meet users’ needs, including identification of opportunities to build new capacity. A wide network of frontline community services and groups provides direct face-to-face support to users through activities such as befriending, transport, fitness, and lunch clubs. The evaluation found that the potential to maintain independence and delay access to adult social care may be less than originally intended as a result of the complexity of the needs and frailty of some programme users. Nonetheless, nearly half of all programme users reported improvement in their satisfaction with the level of social contact they had and a third of programme users reported that their quality of life was better at the review stage compared to the time of their baseline assessment. In addition, the evaluation concluded that the programme has been particularly successful at facilitating access to information. The analysis indicates that the benefits associated with the programme are £1,000 per user per year, including the value of the improvements in health suggested by the impact evaluation (£500), and estimated spill-over effects on the need for informal social care (£492). The report also highlights the positive impact on organisations and systems, and increased volunteering capacity and sets out a series of recommendations to strengthen the delivery of the programme.

Better mental health for all: a public health approach to mental health improvement

FACULTY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION

This report looks at what can be done individually and collectively to improve the mental health of individuals, families and communities and prevent mental health problems using a public health approach. The report aims to encourage proportionate use of universal services with a focus on the promotion of mental wellbeing and on high level support for those at risk of poor mental health and mental health problems, complementing recovery and prevention approaches. Section one maps out why mental health is an important, highlights its economic and social costs and examines why it is often overlooked. Section two outlines the risk and protective factors through the life course from the early years, to adulthood and later-life. It also looks at the risk and protective factors across communities, for example in the home, education and work settings, and the effects of the built environment and neighbourhoods. Section three addresses approaches and interventions to improve mental health at different stages of the life course and in different settings. Section four offers a practical guide to enable practitioners to support their own mental wellbeing. Case studies of innovative public mental health programmes and projects being run across the UK are included throughout. Annex A includes a list of initiatives received as entries for the Faculty of Public Health public mental health award, 10 of which are included in the report as case examples.

The missing million: in search of the loneliest in our communities

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS

A guide to help commissioners and service providers to develop ways of identifying older people experiencing loneliness or who are at risk of being lonely. Section one identifies methods of identifying older people who may be at risk of loneliness. These include top down approaches which use available data and data mapping to identifying geographical areas likely to contain more people at risk; and bottom up approaches, which draw on the local knowledge and capacity of communities to identify and engage with older people experiencing loneliness in their area. Section two illustrates how these different methods can be used and provides case studies to show how they have been used successfully by other organisations. Section three provides advice to help staff and volunteers to speak to people at risk of loneliness in a way that can bring about positive change. It shows the importance of using empathy, openness and respect when holding conversations and also taking a problem-solving approach to help people identify and plan their own solutions. Each section includes summary learning points and provides advice to help providers and commissioners to help change their ways of working. The report makes 10 key recommendations for service providers and commissioners.

The economic value of Dorset POPP services. A focus on two significant issues: malnutrition and fire safety

HARFLETT Naomi, et al

An economic analysis of three schemes from Dorset Partnership for Older People Projects (POPP), focusing on their value and effectiveness in preventing malnutrition and preventing fire related injuries. Dorset POPP schemes use a community led preventative approach and aim to improve the quality of life of older people and to save money by preventing ineffective use of publicly funded services. The report uses published figures of the costs of malnutrition and the economic value of preventing fire injuries and applies the figure to contact monitoring and costs data from three of the Dorset POPP projects to provide an estimate of the potential economic value. The schemes are: the Wayfinder Programme, which provides signposting and support on services such as welfare benefits and pensions, retaining independent living, social activities, telecare and lunch clubs; the Community Initiatives Commissioning Fund (CICF), which funds initiatives identified by local people such as lunch clubs, social clubs, and neighbourcare schemes; and Safe And Independent Living (SAIL) multi-agency referral scheme, which provides a multi-agency referral approach to enabling access to signposting, support, and services. For all of the interventions included in the analysis, just a very small proportion (often less than one per cent) of the contacts or referrals made would be needed to prevent malnutrition or fire related injuries, in order to save money.

Living well in old age: the value of UK housing interventions in supporting mental health and wellbeing in later life

FENDT-NEWLIN Meredith, et al

Reports on an evidence review to explore the role of UK housing interventions in supporting the mental health and wellbeing of older people and their ability to live well at home. The review was commissioned by HACT and carried out by the Social Care Workforce Research Unit at King’s College London. Part one of the report looks at what is known about UK housing interventions that aim to promote mental health and wellbeing among older people. It provides a description of the evidence and the implications for practice and commissioning under the following themes: Identification, diagnosis and management of symptoms; Environments; and Reducing social isolation and loneliness. Part two explores questions around integration and how health, housing and social care agencies are working together to support older people’s mental wellbeing. It identifies some of the barriers to effective collaboration and looks at how these might be overcome. Three key messages emerged from the review of the evidence: the need for people working in service planning and commissioning to include housing needs in the integration debate; the importance of relationships between managers and practitioners from different sectors at a local level; and the need to take a UK perspective in order to share innovation in social housing happening in different parts of the country.

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Evaluation of Music in Mind: findings to date

NEW ECONOMY

This report details the interim findings of the evaluation of the third phase of the Music in Mind (MiM) project. MiM is a music therapy group run by Manchester Camerata that offers free music therapy sessions for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. The sessions aim to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the attendees through music making. The report provides a brief introduction to the MiM project and summarises the findings of a literature review. It then presents the participants’ views of the MiM, as recorded in their diaries or communicated through interviews, and discusses key findings. The key themes that emerge from the evaluation are linked to the mood of the service users: feeling calmer, happier, energised and/or relaxed. Improvements were also noted in PWD’s memory and recollection, confidence levels and relationships with carers. However the extent of other benefits appears to vary greatly depending on the type of dementia the service users’ are living with and the severity of their symptoms. The findings of this evaluation seem to be in line with the literature, suggesting that MIM appears to promote general wellbeing amongst participants and have a positive impact on relationships.

Results 1 - 10 of 47

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