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Results for 'leadership'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

The force begins to awaken: a third review of the state of health and wellbeing boards

SHARED INTELLIGENCE

An evaluation of the current position of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs), which seeks to identify features and factors that influence whether or not a board makes significant progress. The report draws on information from interviews with 23 local and national stakeholders involved with HWBs; a workshop with people doing bespoke work with boards on behalf of the Local Government Association; observation of and a focus group discussion at a HWB leadership essentials course; and a review of eight health and wellbeing peer challenges. The report identifies a number of factors which have a significant influence on the effectiveness of a HWB. Factors identified are: committed leadership; a history of collaboration between health and social care; clarity of purpose; a geography that works; the response to austerity; a focus on place; a director of public health who understands the role of HWB; high quality day-to-day support; changes in board membership and leadership; and good basic housekeeping to enable effective leadership. The final section of the report summarises key actions and areas to address if boards are to be more effective. The report concludes that a small but significant number of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) are now beginning to play a genuine leadership role across the local health and care system. It finds that boards are considerably more effective than they were a year ago and a number of other boards are on the cusp of making that shift. Most boards are doing useful work, but their potential remains unfulfilled.

Growing old together: sharing new ways to support older people

COMMISSION ON IMPROVING URGENT CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE

Final report from the Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People which provides guidance for those involved in designing care for older people and outlines eight key principles the health and care sector can adopt to improve urgent care for older people. The Commission was established out of a concern that the care system was not meeting the needs of older people, resulting in lower quality of care, a lack of out-of-hospital services as an alternative to A&E, not enough focus on prevention and early intervention, and delayed transfers of care. It brought together a range of experts, received over 60 evidence submissions; carried out visits to sites using innovative ways to deliver care; consulted with NHS Confederation members and patient and carer groups; and commissioned an evidence review. The report draws on the evidence to look at the case for change. It then outlines eight key principles that can be used when redesigning health and social care system: start with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals; a greater focus on proactive care; acknowledge current strains on the system and allow time to think; the importance of care co-ordination and navigation; greater use of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams; ensure workforce, training and core skills reflect modern day requirements; leadership should encourage us to do things differently; and metrics must truly reflect the care experience for older people. Short case studies of innovative practice are included in the report, covering acute and primary care, voluntary sector and local government partners and commissioners.

Commissioning for better outcomes: a route map

UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM. Health Services Management Centre

Sets out standards for high quality commissioning to support a dynamic process of continuous improvement and, through self-assessment and peer review, to challenge commissioners and their partners, to strengthen and innovate to achieve improved outcomes for adults using social care, their carers, families and communities. There are 12 standards grouped into four domains, including person-centred and outcome-focused commissioning, inclusiveness, effective leadership and promotion of sustainable and diverse market place. They have been developed from a review of the available literature, the engagement of a wide range of stakeholders, the input from a project steering group coordinated by Think Local Act Personal, and an expert review of a final draft of the standards by local authorities and other key organisations. The prototype document will be piloted by a small number of local authorities and will shape and inform a new offer within the Local Government Association peer challenge programme which will become available in April 2015.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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