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Results for 'literature reviews'

Results 1 - 8 of 8

The role of advice services in health outcomes: evidence review and mapping study

PARKINSON Andy, BUTTRICK Jamie

Evidence review, undertaken through a joint project between the Low Commission and the Advice Services Alliance, to examine the impact of social welfare advice services on health outcomes. The review outlines key findings from 140 research studies and also provides an overview of 58 integrated health and welfare advice services. Advice services covered in the review included those providing advice on debts, welfare benefits, housing, employment and discrimination advice. The results of the evidence review are discussed across the following areas: health inequalities; debt and mental health; primary care; secondary and tertiary care, including mental health services. The analysis finds that welfare advice provided in health context results in better individual health and well-being and lower demand for health services. Positive effects on health and welbeing include: lower stress and anxiety, better sleeping patterns, more effective use of medication, smoking cessation, and improved diet and physical activity. It shows how the right welfare advice in the right place produces real benefits for patient health especially where advice services work directly with the NHS and care providers, and presents evidence to show that early and effective advice provision reduces demand on the NHS. It provides recommendations for NHS, Local Authority Commissioners, Health and Wellbeing Boards, and the advice sector for the use welfare advice services to improve health outcomes, address health inequalities and reduce demand on the NHS.

Living well in old age: the value of UK housing interventions in supporting mental health and wellbeing in later life

FENDT-NEWLIN Meredith, et al

Reports on an evidence review to explore the role of UK housing interventions in supporting the mental health and wellbeing of older people and their ability to live well at home. The review was commissioned by HACT and carried out by the Social Care Workforce Research Unit at King’s College London. Part one of the report looks at what is known about UK housing interventions that aim to promote mental health and wellbeing among older people. It provides a description of the evidence and the implications for practice and commissioning under the following themes: Identification, diagnosis and management of symptoms; Environments; and Reducing social isolation and loneliness. Part two explores questions around integration and how health, housing and social care agencies are working together to support older people’s mental wellbeing. It identifies some of the barriers to effective collaboration and looks at how these might be overcome. Three key messages emerged from the review of the evidence: the need for people working in service planning and commissioning to include housing needs in the integration debate; the importance of relationships between managers and practitioners from different sectors at a local level; and the need to take a UK perspective in order to share innovation in social housing happening in different parts of the country.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

Shared-life communities for people with a learning disability: a review of evidence

CUMELLA Stuart

A review of the evidence from research about shared-life communities for people with a learning disability, summarising the results from the small number of academic studies which have attempted to measure the quality of life of people with a learning disability living in such communities. This study shows how shared-life communities facilitate a high quality of life for their residents with a learning disability and in particular: high levels of meaningful employment - residents are able to work full time in a range of unskilled and skilled work essential to the daily life and economy of the community, while also exercising choice over where they are able to work; opportunities for friendship - a shared-life communities provide a large clustering of potential friends with the opportunity to meet in workplace and informal settings, while ease of communication enables friendships to be sustained; and long-term relationships - living in extended families in a long-term social relationship with co-workers/assistants enables both groups to become familiar with each other’s pattern of communication.

Bibliography and map of community-centred interventions for health and wellbeing

BAGNALL A.M., et al

This bibliography and map present the results of a scoping review undertaken as part of a national knowledge translation project ‘Working with Communities – Empowerment, Evidence and Learning’ (2014-2015), jointly funded and steered by NHS England and Public Health England (PHE). This project aimed to support better, more effective working with communities on health and wellbeing through improving access to existing evidence and learning. The first part of this report presents the bibliography, with a total of 168 publications organised into types of study/resource, whether they relate specifically to UK practice or are non-UK studies covering international research. The second part of the report describes the scoping review methods and results of the mapping, in terms of the spread of evidence resources and characteristics. In terms of the types of outcomes that were reported in the included studies, process outcomes (i.e. how an intervention was implemented) were the most frequently reported, followed by service delivery and organisational outcomes, wellbeing outcomes and health outcomes. Economic outcomes were reported in 43 studies, and outcomes relating to the social determinants of health were reported in only 41 studies. Wellbeing outcomes were slightly more likely to be reported at a community level than were health outcomes.

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Making a case for information: full report

TREADGOLD Paul, GRANT Carol

This research report highlights how providing information to patients and their carers improves outcomes, reduces costs and gives people a better experience of care. Consumer health information (CHI) is defined as information and support provided to help patients and carers understand, manage and/or make decisions about their health, condition or treatment. High quality means effective information, which meets the needs of users and empowers them to make choices and take control of their health and wellbeing. The Patient Information Forum (PiF) commissioned research to identify the benefits of investing in health information. The project, which looked at over 300 studies, found that there are good business reasons to justify the investment of more time, money and training in health information provision and support. These include positive impacts on service use and costs, substantial capacity savings, and significant returns on investment by increasing shared decision-making, self-care and the self-management of long-term conditions.

Building a business case for investing in adaptive technologies in England

SNELL Tom, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, FORDER Julien

For many dependent adults, the provision of adaptive technologies provides a means to independent living and a decrease in the reliance on support from family members or more costly social care services. At present, the two main sources of state funding for equipment and adaptations are through Community Equipment Services (for minor adaptations up to a value of £1,000, such as grab rails) and through Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) (for major adaptations up to a value of £30,000, such as stairllifts or bathroom modifications). While costs of provision vary greatly by type of intervention, the majority of the research literature focuses on adaptations with an average value of approximately £6,000. The research described in this report provides an evaluation of the outcomes associated with the provision of adaptive technologies at an economic level, and, by extension. the likely impact of increases or reductions in investment in the context of increasing constraints on social care budgets. The analysis followed a three-stage process. The first stage was a systematic review of the literature in which the available evidence on the costs, effectiveness and outcomes associated with adaptive technologies was systematically collected and analysed. In the second stage, an analysis incorporating the findings gathered in the literature review was used to build a quantitative simulation model of the outcomes associated with aids and adaptations. At the final stage, the output of the literature review and model were used to inform a discussion around the policy implications. The research in this report was supported by a grant from Stannah and the British Healthcare Trades Association.

Results 1 - 8 of 8

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