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Results for 'neighbourhoods'

Results 1 - 9 of 9

Developing asset based approaches to primary care: best practice guide


This is a practical guide for getting started and growing asset based primary care at scale. It highlights examples of asset based approaches from both within Greater Manchester and beyond. Assets can be broadly grouped into: personal assets e.g. the knowledge, skills, talents and aspirations of individuals; social assets e.g. relationships and connections that people have with their friends, family and peers; community assets e.g. voluntary sector organisations (VSO) associations, clubs and community groups; and neighbourhood assets e.g. physical places and buildings that contribute to health and wellbeing such as parks, libraries and leisure centres. Drawing on research with commissioners, GPs, the community and voluntary sector, public health professionals, patients and the general population, the guide sets out what it takes to make asset based primary care work in practice, and what it would take to adopt it, not just in isolated pockets but across a whole neighbourhood, system or region. It details the background to asset based care, presents ten case studies and makes recommendations for how to develop an asset based primary care in a locality. Key steps to developing and implementing an assets-based approach include: setting up a team to lead the work; understanding which patients to focus on; understanding and mapping the user journey; understanding which approach will work best in a community; creating a development plan for the neighbourhood team; implementing and evaluating the plan; and planning for sustainability.

Local early action: how to make it happen

COOTE Anna, BUA Adrian

Reports on the work of the Southwark and Lambeth Early Action Commission which was set up to explore ways of taking local early action and preventative measures to improve people’s quality of life and reduce pressure on public services. The Commission carried out a review of local strategy, policy and practice; explored more than 30 examples of good practice in the two boroughs and further afield; and engaged with local residents and community-based groups and with other experts, through workshops and interviews. The Commission found the underlying causes of most social problems could be traced to the same social and economic challenges. Although some of these challenges, such as poverty and inequality were linked to national policy, making it hard to tackle them locally areas were identified where local early action could be effective in prevent problems. The Commission identified four goals for early action in Southwark and Lambeth: developing resourceful communities, where residents and groups act as agents of change; preventative places, where the quality of neighbourhoods has a positive impact on how people feel and enables them to help themselves and each other; strong partnerships between organisations; and where local institutions support early action. Case studies of good practice to support the report’s recommendations for prevention and early action are included.

Friends on tap: the role of pubs at the heart of the community


This report summarises a series of studies carried out on behalf of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) on the role that community pubs play in people’s health, happiness and social cohesion. To set the scene, the paper first provides a brief overview of how people create their friendships. It then raises the problem of large scale social cohesion and provides some insights into how social cohesion has been engineered in the past. Finally, it presents the findings from a national poll of pub use and two studies of behaviour in pubs undertaken to assess the social value of small community pubs compared to large city centre pubs. The evidence suggests that while 40 per cent of people in the UK now typically socialise with friends in someone’s home, a third of the population prefer to do so in pubs, and regard pubs as a safe place to meet friends. People who said they have a ‘local’ or those who patronise small community pubs appear to have more close friends on whom they can depend for support, are more satisfied with their lives and feel more embedded in their local communities than those who said they do not have a local pub. The paper makes a number of recommendations for publicans, city planners and policy makers to ensure pubs play a role in people’s health, wellbeing and community cohesion.

Resilience in practice


This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

Researching age-friendly communities: stories from older people as co-investigators


This guide evaluates the experience of involving older people in a research study that explored the age-friendliness of three areas of Manchester. It offers practical tips and critical reflections to help rethink how older people can be involved in research and social action to improve the physical and social environment of their neighbourhood. For the project a group 18 older residents were recruited and trained in designing interview questions, interviewing, data collection, and sharing the findings. The guide outlines the aims of the study, the methodology of the research and a summary of research activities undertaken. It then covers: what 'age-friendly means'; the co-researchers' motivations to participate in the study; the advantages and challenges of involving older residents; skills and knowledge acquired through the project; key findings; and suggested improvements to the age-friendliness of neighbourhoods. The guide includes contributions from older co-interviewers and representatives of community organisations who were involved in the project. The guide concludes by suggesting three principles for developing age-friendly neighbourhoods: that they should empower older people and enable social participation; they are a reminder about the rights of all citizens to full use of resources in their neighbourhood; and the importance of recognising both the social and physical dimensions which make up age-friendly communities.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils


This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people


A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Measuring national well-being: an analysis of social capital in the UK

SIEGLER Veronique

This article provides a baseline analysis of social capital in the UK, using the latest available data. The data are based on 25 headline measures proposed by the Office for National Statistics, which cover four key aspects of social capital: personal relationships, social network support, civic engagement and trust and cooperative norms. Key findings include: around 1 in 10 people in the UK reported feeling lonely all, most, or more than half of the time in 2011/12 and just over a third said that they wish they could spend more time with their family and have more social contact. Nearly 1 in 5 people reported looking after or giving special help to someone sick, disabled or elderly and nearly a fifth of people had given unpaid help or worked as a volunteer in a local, national or international organisation or charity in the last 12 months in 2012/13. Half of people reported being very or quite interested in politics and around two-thirds thought people in their neighbourhood could be trusted. Nearly three-quarters of people felt people in their neighbourhood get along with each other and are willing to help each other.

Can a neighbourhood approach to loneliness contribute to people's well-being?: report


This report evaluates the overall impact of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme. The main principles of the Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme are that community activities can contribute to the well-being of people at risk of, or experiencing, loneliness; that such people can play a central role in these activities; and that this involvement can also enhance community well-being. This report is based on consultation with community researchers, professional stakeholders, programme staff and community members. The report highlights that good practice requires skilled staff who are able to communicate effectively and provide pastoral support to volunteers; reveals changes in community researchers resulting from their involvement in the programme; demonstrates where there has been community impact; and shares wider lessons which can be learnt from taking a neighbourhood approach.

Results 1 - 9 of 9