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Results for 'poverty'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities.

Growing healthy communities: the Health and Wellbeing Index

GRANT THORNTON UK LLP

This report highlights the extent to which economic, social and environmental determinants translate to good or bad health outcomes in their broadest sense. It also shows the scale and nature of inequality across the country and reiterates the need for a local, place-based approach to tackling health outcomes. The report is based on league tables that assess 33 key health determinants and outcomes at local authority district level. The analysis reveals that the top three determinants that most strongly correlate to health outcomes are child poverty, deprivation and unemployment. Crime ranks as only seventh strongest with childhood education, social cohesions and occupations all proven as having a bigger impact on overall health outcomes. Case studies from Barnet, Greenwich and Richmond and Kingston outline some of the lessons that can be learnt from these and where collaboration has been seen to address an area’s determinants to improve health outcomes. That nine of the ten fall within London, where the boundaries of health commissioning are coterminous with those of the local authority may imply more readily facilitated joint-working leading to improved outcomes.

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

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