#EXCLUDE#

SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.

#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'recovery approach'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Mental Health Prevention & Personalisation Service

Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council

Stockport’s Prevention and Personalisation Service is a person-centred recovery-focused approach to providing mental health services. By working with people to identify what they want to achieve in their lives, and to support them to overcome non-medical barriers which are hindering their recovery, the service aims to improve people’s wellbeing; reduce use of secondary services and prevent a dependency on medical care, where this is avoidable.

Investing in recovery: making the business case for effective interventions for people with schizophrenia and psychosis

KNAPP Martin, et al

This study provides economic evidence to support the case for investing in effective, recovery-focused services for people with schizophrenia and psychosis. Drawing on a wide range of data, it sets out the evidence for the cost-effectiveness for a range of interventions and service. Those discussed are: Early Detection (ED) services; Early Intervention (EI) teams; Individual Placement and Support (IPS); Family therapy; Criminal justice liaison and diversion; Physical health promotion, including health behaviours; Supported housing; Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment (CRHT) teams; Crisis houses; Peer support; Self-management; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT); Anti-stigma and discrimination campaigns; Personal Budgets (PBs); and Welfare advice. For each intervention the report provides information on the context, the nature of the intervention, the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and the policy and practice implications. The report finds evidence to suggest that all of the interventions contribute to recovery outcomes, reduced costs and/or better value for money. Examples of the savings incurred through particular interventions are also included. The study was undertaken by a team from the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Centre for Mental Health, and the Centre for the Economics of Mental and Physical Health (CEMPH) at King’s College London.

Creating a recovery focused workforce: supporting staff well-being and valuing the expertise of lived experience

WALKER Liz, PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that if mental health services are to genuinely support the recovery of those who they serve then recovery principles must permeate all facets of the organisation, in particular human resources and workforce development. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on the principles of recovery-focused approaches to people who use services and explores how these might guide a recovery-focused approaches to human resources and workforce issues. Findings: The recovery principles like recognising and utilising the expertise of lived experience, co-production and shared decision making, peer support, focusing on strengths and becoming an expert in your own self-care all have as much relevance for creating a recovery-focused workforce as they do in the recovery journeys of those who use services. Everyone who uses services is “more than a mental patient” and everyone who provides services is “more than a mental health practitioner” – we need to use all the assets that everyone brings. Originality/value: Although there has been a great deal of discussion about the features of recovery-focused services, there has been little, if any, consideration of extending the principles of recovery to human resources. The aim of this paper is not to offer a blue print but to begin an exploration of what a recovery-focused approach to workforce issues might look like.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

Creative practice as mutual recovery in mental health

CRAWFORD Paul, et al

This article reviews the literature review to examine the value of approaches to mental health based on creative practice in the humanities and arts, and explore these in relation to the potential contribution to mutual recovery. It found recovery can embrace carers and practitioners as well as sufferers from mental health problems. Divisions tend to exist between those with mental health needs, informal carers and health, social care and education personnel. Mutual recovery is therefore a very useful term because it instigates a more fully social understanding of mental health recovery processes, encompassing diverse actors in the field of mental health. Research demonstrates the importance of arts for “recovery orientated mental health services”, how they provide ways of breaking down social barriers, of expressing and understanding experiences and emotions, and of helping to rebuild identities and communities. Similarly, the humanities can advance the recovery of health and well-being. The notion of mutual recovery through creative practice is more than just a set of creative activities which are believed to have benefit. The idea is also a heuristic that can be useful to professionals and family members, as well as individuals with mental health problems themselves. Mutual recovery is perhaps best seen as a relational construct, offering new opportunities to build egalitarian, appreciative and substantively connected communities – resilient communities of mutual hope, compassion and solidarity.

Complex needs survey: informing the development of a community recovery and rehabilitation team

BEKAS Stavros

This study aimed to inform the development of a new, recovery-oriented rehabilitation service, identify local needs and create a pathway for appropriate referrals, accelerating the build up of case-load. 1353 secondary service users subject to Care Programme Approach under four local community teams, an assertive outreach team and an early interventions service were surveyed using a purpose-made needs assessment and case identification questionnaire. Significant unmet need for rehabilitation and recovery-oriented interventions was found. The results were used to invite referrals, create a case-load of 150 and allocate the appropriate resources for the new team. The results highlight the untapped recovery potential among users of mainstream secondary mental health services and support investment in rehabilitation at a time of resource restriction. This work also supports a similar, evidence-based approach to targeting appropriate referrals during the development and the early stages of rehabilitation services.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#