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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'resilience'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

Local area coordination: catalyst for a system wide prevention approach

MCELENEY Maureen

Examines the role of local area coordination as a driver for positive systems change. Local area coordination is a personal, human approach to supporting individuals and families to build resilience, relationships and contribution and reduce demand for, and dependence on, services. It also nurtures more welcoming, inclusive and supportive communities and creates the conditions for wider systems change. The report argues that local area coordination works as a driving force for transformation and prevention in three significant ways: person-centred prevention, through building individual, family and community resilience through self-sufficiency and mutual support; behavioural prevention, by helping to produce culture and behaviour change across such diverse groups as social workers, health and housing professionals as well as others, including the fire service; and structural prevention, bringing together the strengths and assets within and across communities, individuals and groups to ensure that available help is utilised effectively. The document also looks at how local area coordination links to other prevention models and sectors, including: ‘Living Well’ programme; social prescribing; housing; employment; and commissioning/market development.

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales

BROAD Ralph

This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people

AGE UK

A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Lifestyles in later life: identity, choice and stigma: AKTIVE working paper 5

HAMBLIN Kate

This paper explores the identities and lifestyle choices of older people participating in the AKTIVE study and considers how telecare can support the maintenance of independence and preferred identities. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. The paper focuses on strategies and situations which enable older people to retain important elements of their identity, including their attachment to home and good relations within families. It also examines the circumstances in which telecare can be a source of stigma for older people, compromising self-perceptions and viewed as a sign of dependency. The paper draws on research evidence about who the older people in the AKTIVE study felt they ‘really are’. Using three key concepts, ‘identity’, ‘choice’ and ‘stigma’, it explores the subjective realities older people shared in talk and interactions during research visits over six to nine months in 2012-13 and outlines the ‘identity-management strategies’, which are conceptualised as a form of resilience, used by older people to maintain or protect cherished elements of their identities and the role of telecare in these choices, behaviours and strategies.

The contribution of self-help/mutual aid groups to mental well-being

SEEBOHM Patience, et al

To explore the contribution of self-help/mutual aid groups to mental well-being this article draws on data from stage one of ESTEEM, a project which runs from 2010 to 2013. Stage one ran from 2010 to 2011 and involved participatory, qualitative research carried out in two UK sites. Twenty-one groups were purposively selected to include a range of focal issues, longevity, structures and ethnic backgrounds. Researchers carried out 21 interviews with group coordinators and twenty group discussions with members to explore the groups' purpose, nature and development. Preliminary analysis of the data suggested that mental well-being was a common theme across the groups. Subsequently the data were re-analysed to explore the groups' contribution to mental well-being using a checklist of protective factors for mental well-being as a coding framework. The findings showed that groups made a strong contribution to members' mental well-being by enhancing a sense of control, increasing resilience and facilitating participation. Group members were uplifted by exchanging emotional and practical support; they gained self-esteem, knowledge and confidence, thereby increasing their control over their situation. For some groups, socio-economic factors limited their scope and threatened their future. The article provides an evidence-base which illustrates how self-help/mutual aid groups can enhance mental well-being. If supported within a strategy for social justice, these groups enable people with varied concerns to develop a tailored response to their specific needs. The authors suggest that policy-makers engage with local people, investing in support proportionate to the needs of different populations, enabling them to develop their own self-help/mutual aid groups to enhance their sense of mental well-being.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 1 - 7 of 7

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