#EXCLUDE#

SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.

#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'resource allocation'

Results 1 - 2 of 2

Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future

ERNST AND YOUNG

In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

Results 1 - 2 of 2

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#