SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.


Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'risk'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Better mental health for all: a public health approach to mental health improvement


This report looks at what can be done individually and collectively to improve the mental health of individuals, families and communities and prevent mental health problems using a public health approach. The report aims to encourage proportionate use of universal services with a focus on the promotion of mental wellbeing and on high level support for those at risk of poor mental health and mental health problems, complementing recovery and prevention approaches. Section one maps out why mental health is an important, highlights its economic and social costs and examines why it is often overlooked. Section two outlines the risk and protective factors through the life course from the early years, to adulthood and later-life. It also looks at the risk and protective factors across communities, for example in the home, education and work settings, and the effects of the built environment and neighbourhoods. Section three addresses approaches and interventions to improve mental health at different stages of the life course and in different settings. Section four offers a practical guide to enable practitioners to support their own mental wellbeing. Case studies of innovative public mental health programmes and projects being run across the UK are included throughout. Annex A includes a list of initiatives received as entries for the Faculty of Public Health public mental health award, 10 of which are included in the report as case examples.

The missing million: in search of the loneliest in our communities


A guide to help commissioners and service providers to develop ways of identifying older people experiencing loneliness or who are at risk of being lonely. Section one identifies methods of identifying older people who may be at risk of loneliness. These include top down approaches which use available data and data mapping to identifying geographical areas likely to contain more people at risk; and bottom up approaches, which draw on the local knowledge and capacity of communities to identify and engage with older people experiencing loneliness in their area. Section two illustrates how these different methods can be used and provides case studies to show how they have been used successfully by other organisations. Section three provides advice to help staff and volunteers to speak to people at risk of loneliness in a way that can bring about positive change. It shows the importance of using empathy, openness and respect when holding conversations and also taking a problem-solving approach to help people identify and plan their own solutions. Each section includes summary learning points and provides advice to help providers and commissioners to help change their ways of working. The report makes 10 key recommendations for service providers and commissioners.

AT and telecare to manage fire risks in the homes of older and vulnerable people


Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities where technology interventions could help manage the risks associated with fire and explosions in homes of people who are older or who are vulnerable through other causes such as mental health problems or a history of substance abuse. Design/methodology/approach: The approach focused on reviewing the latest available statistics in order to identify the major causes and rooms in which fire accidents occurred. Findings: The authors found that the number of incidents and fatalities continues to decrease as a result of preventive measures such as a greater use of smoke detectors, but that there remained issues with cooking safety. New products for limiting damage and managing risks are available which could have a positive impact. Research limitations/implications: The paper concludes that the challenges are making both professionals and the public aware of the available technologies and of introducing them following appropriate assessment of needs and risks. Practical implications: Greater resources need to be offered for training of the public and of health and safety professionals. Further funding may be needed to implement the introduction of new technology. Originality/value: This is the most up-to-date review of fire control measures employing assistive technology and telecare for domestic properties and will be of value to community health teams, adults care organisations, housing associations and other public bodies.

Psychological well-being and social support for parents with intellectual disabilities: risk factors and interventions

DARBYSHIRE Laura Valerie, KROESE Biza Stenfert

The pressure of becoming a parent for a person with intellectual disabilities (ID) may magnify the risks of social isolation and poor psychological well-being. This review examined the psychological well-being and social support among parents with ID, addressing three aims that explore the importance of these two factors in their lives. A search of electronic databases uncovered eight studies which met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that parents with ID experience poorer psychological well-being than the general parenting population and a relationship was found between psychological well-being and social support. Two of the intervention studies found evidence that by improving social support, psychological well-being was improved. The relationship between social support and parenting ability was supported by findings of a positive relationship between satisfaction with social support and positive maternal reactions. A number of recommendations for further research are suggested to more fully explore the relationship between psychological well-being and social support.

Results 1 - 4 of 4