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Results for 'self-directed support'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Supporting self-management: summarising evidence from systematic reviews

NATIONAL VOICES

This booklet sets out research findings of the benefits of supporting people to self-manage. It also sets out the evidence for the impact of self-management education for patients, proactive telephone and psychosocial support, home-based self-monitoring and simplified dosing strategies and information. Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage their own healthcare independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system. People feel more confident and engaged when they are encouraged to self-manage by professionals, therefore supporting self-management is key to prioritising person-centred care. Drawing on the findings from 228 systematic reviews, the paper concludes that the top three things that might most usefully be invested in are disease specific, generic and on-line self-management courses, proactive telephone support and self monitoring of symptoms and vital signs.

Taking on and taking over: choice and control for physically disabled young adults

MITCHELL Wendy, et al

Summarises the findings of a study on approaches to supporting physically disabled young adults to achieve their preferred levels of control over care and support arrangements. The study took place between July 2012 and January 2014 and involved semi-structured interviews with young adults, parents and social care professionals. It examined physically disabled young adults experiences of managing their care and support arrangements and explored how they can be better supported. Key findings and practice implications are included. While welcoming the opportunities afforded by personalised approaches within adult social care, almost all the young adults described feeling daunted by the associated responsibilities, with managing personal assistants/carers consistently identified as the most difficult aspect of having a Direct Payment. Young adults found information from statutory services was typically targeted at other audiences, for example, older people and only a minority believed transition planning/support services had played a significant role in preparing them for taking on a Personal Budget. Social workers with more experience of working with young adults identified specific issues that need to be accommodated including: young adults’ relative lack of life skills and experience; young adults’ preferences regarding parental involvement; and addressing parents’ support needs.

Results 1 - 3 of 3

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