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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'service development'

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Away from the past and to a sustainable future: how the UK’s health and social care systems can be reformed to better align with the needs of today’s society

SMITH Ian R., SMITH Stephen K.

This paper explores the nature of the crisis affecting the health and social care systems, suggesting that they are badly misaligned with the needs of the society they serve, its ageing population, the prevalence of chronic ill health, rising demand and fall in funding. The paper diagnoses the reasons behind this misalignment and posits a solution: the introduction of integrated care organisations (ICOs) closely aligned to academic health and science centres (AHSCs). It argues that ICOs will remove the artificial and unhelpful boundaries between different parts of the healthcare service, and between health and social care. They will meet the needs of a population which is living longer and with more chronic conditions, move care away from hospitals, and promote prevention and parity of esteem between mental and physical health. Through alignment of these organisations with academic health and science centres, meanwhile, it will be possible to improve clinical outcomes and deliver precision medicine – and to sustain the UK’s position as one of the world leaders in genetic medicine. The paper also identifies the barriers to instituting such a change and explains how they can be overcome. It concludes with a step by step route map to a better care system, through ICOs and AHSCs.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

Improving later life: services for older people: what works

AGE UK

This report presents jargon-free summaries of research on key aspects of services for older people, each written by experts in their field. It also draws out seven major themes from the research covering service design, the role of carers, the need for regular assessment, and the importance of social interaction. Contributors cover the following areas: service cost-effectiveness, what works in integrating health and care, dignity of older service users, safeguarding, supporting older people and their carers, council managed personal budgets, paying for social care, involving older people in evaluation and research, preventing isolation and loneliness, promoting inclusion in rural communities, housing with care, home telecare, supporting older people in the community, services for men, falls prevention, assistive technology for people with dementia, cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia, and memory services.

Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance

SKILLS FOR CARE

The practice guidance has been produced to support people who have the responsibility for commissioning assisted living technology (ALT) and assisted living services (ALS). These services include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. The guide looks at general principles, such as establishing a vision and defining the strategy; carrying out a local needs assessment; service specification and procurement; and developing systems to measure performance and impact. Although primarily developed for commissioners based in social care settings, it may also be useful for those working across housing or health services. An accompanying research report and toolkit have also been produced.

Results 1 - 10 of 12

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