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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'service users'

Results 1 - 8 of 8

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Assisted living technology and services: a learning development framework

SKILLS FOR CARE

A learning and development framework to support those involved in the commissioning, design or delivery of workforce development. The framework aims to help ensure that the social care workforce has the skills and knowledge to use assisted living technology to enhance the lives of vulnerable people and their carers. Five stages provide the structure for the framework: Readiness; Customer Flow Analysis (guidance to assist the identification of work or service flow in your or your partner's organisation); Workforce Analysis (which provides guidance on how to map tasks and roles to knowledge and skills needed); Learning Design and Delivery (providing tools and resources for learning) and Checking (helping to evaluate the impact of learning). The framework also provides definitions, terminology and language that can be used by all when preparing workforce development products in the assistive living technology field.

Maximising the potential for the use of assistive technology: an information toolkit to support people with dementia, their carers and dementia services

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES, IMPROVEMENT AND EFFICIENCY WEST MIDLANDS, COMMUNITY GATEWAY CIC

Assistive Technology is “any product or service designed to enable independence for disabled and older people, and their carers”, or “any device or system that allows individuals to perform tasks that they would otherwise be unable to do, or increases the ease and safety with which tasks can be performed”. This guide brings together references and guides, many of which support more accurate assessment of need and which explain how assistive technology can support either people with dementia or their families or indeed carers. An emphasis is placed on case studies as examples of the application of technology solutions designed around the person, so the examples are highly personalised and tailored to individual needs.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

Creative practice as mutual recovery in mental health

CRAWFORD Paul, et al

This article reviews the literature review to examine the value of approaches to mental health based on creative practice in the humanities and arts, and explore these in relation to the potential contribution to mutual recovery. It found recovery can embrace carers and practitioners as well as sufferers from mental health problems. Divisions tend to exist between those with mental health needs, informal carers and health, social care and education personnel. Mutual recovery is therefore a very useful term because it instigates a more fully social understanding of mental health recovery processes, encompassing diverse actors in the field of mental health. Research demonstrates the importance of arts for “recovery orientated mental health services”, how they provide ways of breaking down social barriers, of expressing and understanding experiences and emotions, and of helping to rebuild identities and communities. Similarly, the humanities can advance the recovery of health and well-being. The notion of mutual recovery through creative practice is more than just a set of creative activities which are believed to have benefit. The idea is also a heuristic that can be useful to professionals and family members, as well as individuals with mental health problems themselves. Mutual recovery is perhaps best seen as a relational construct, offering new opportunities to build egalitarian, appreciative and substantively connected communities – resilient communities of mutual hope, compassion and solidarity.

Well-being and dementia - how can it be achieved?

WOODS Bob

In this article, the author reviews findings in dementia care on interventions and on quality of life with the aim of identifying factors associated with quality of life which can form the basis for interventions enhancing quality of life for people with dementia. The article looks at evaluation of well-being and quality of life in people with dementia, including the importance of "hearing the voice of people with dementia", and the key factors predicting quality of life in people with dementia. Drawing on this, it suggests potential strategies and interventions for improving quality of life in people with dementia: improve mood, maintain health, hopeful staff attitudes, reduce use of anti-psychotic medication, enhance relationship with carer, encourage family involvement, cognitive stimulation and cognitive rehabilitation, and creative activities and approaches.

Reducing social isolation and promoting well being in older people

HEMINGWAY Ann, JACK Eleanor

A UK charity established a network of 70 friendship clubs in the south of England, facilitated by volunteers, with the aim of promoting well-being for older people. The charity provides venues and transport for participants to meet and enjoy activities locally every week for 2 hours. This article reports on a 3 year research project exploring the impacts of the intervention, using qualitative research methods and including participant observation and individual and focus group interviews. The study was based on 10 of the friendship clubs and collected information from 82 members and 18 volunteers. The article describes the intervention and the study methodology. It presents the results, with illustrative quotations from participants, covering views on the risk of becoming isolated, feeling isolated, and friendship and support. It identifies additional factors that can predispose an individual to become socially isolated, including environment and safety fears, fear of falling, and loss of confidence, and notes that even when living with their families older people can still feel socially isolated. It reports that club members and volunteers viewed themselves as assets for each other, offering support, advice and friendship, and that, overall, the perceived benefits for attendees of attending the friendship clubs fell into 3 key areas: improved well-being, social relations, and mental and physical health.

Taking stock: assessing the value of preventative support

BRITISH RED CROSS

The aim of this report is to illustrate how British Red Cross preventative services providing time-limited practical and emotional support deliver savings for public sector partners including the NHS and local authorities. It presents brief case studies of 5 people who received personalised support from British Red Cross staff and volunteers to help them live independently in their communities. In each case it describes the action taken and the impact of the services and support provided. It includes an independent economic analysis of each case study assessing the costs which could have been incurred by statutory services in delivering care in the absence of the British Red Cross services. It reports that savings of between £700 and over £10,000 were delivered per person, and that this reflects a minimum return on investment of over 3.5 times the cost of the British Red Cross service provided.

Results 1 - 8 of 8

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