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Results for 'social care'

Results 11 - 20 of 25

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report


This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Social action: harnessing the potential: a discussion paper

GREAT BRITAIN. Cabinet Office

This discussion paper explains what social action is and how it plays an important role in helping to respond to long-standing challenges. Social action is about people coming together to help improve their lives and solve the problems that are important in their communities. The paper provides an update on government programmes to develop its reach and impact. It sets out how social action: empowers local groups, enabling local solutions and building resilient communities; increases the resources available to achieve social goals; offers new sources of expertise and knowledge; enables broader and better targeted support; creates new models for how society can respond to challenges; and helps reduce demands on public services.

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm


Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

A guide to community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing: full report


Outlines a 'family' of approaches for evidence-based community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing. The report presents the work undertaken in phase 1 of the 'Working with communities: empowerment evidence and learning' project, which was initiated jointly by PHE and NHS England to draw together and disseminate research and learning on community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. The report provides a guide to the case for change, the concepts, the varieties of approach that have been tried and tested and sources of evidence. The new family of community-centred approaches outlined in this document represents some of the available options that can be used to improve health and wellbeing, grouped around four different strands: strengthening communities - where approaches involve building on community capacities to take action together on health and the social determinants of health; volunteer and peer roles - where approaches focus on enhancing individuals' capabilities to provide advice, information and support or organise activities around health and wellbeing in their or other communities; collaborations and partnerships - where approaches involve communities and local services working together at any stage of planning cycle, from identifying needs through to implementation and evaluation; and access to community resources - where approaches connect people to community resources, practical help, group activities and volunteering opportunities to meet health needs and increase social participation.

The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population

LLOYD James, ROSS Andy

Explores disability and care at a national, regional and local authority level in England. The report brings together data from Census 2011, DWP and HSCIC ‘administrative data’, as well as from Wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, to look at the prevalence of disability, need and care of different types, and to paint a picture of the lives of different groups. In particular, Chapter 3 provides a snapshot of disability and care in the older population in England, identifying key results. Chapter 4 looks in detail at the lives of older people with limited day-to-day activities, from their health characteristics to their living situation. Chapter 5 explores the characteristics of older people receiving unpaid and paid care including the overall adequacy of their care, as well as older people with substantial levels of disability who experience difficulty undertaking three or more ‘activities of daily living’. Chapter 6 explores the interaction of older people experiencing limited day-to-day activities with public support, i.e. disability benefits and the local authority care and support system. Chapter 7 examines the prevalence of unpaid older carers and the outcomes they experience, as well as the extent of local authority support for them. The report shows that around half of the 65+ population in England reported their day-to-day activities were limited. Of the 6.7 per cent of the older population living at home in England who reported difficulty undertaking three or more activities of daily living, around 70,000 did not receive any care, and could therefore be classed as experiencing substantial unmet need. Around 20 per cent of older carers experienced self-care (ADL) difficulties themselves.

The bigger picture: policy insights and recommendations


This report evaluates the performance of government policy on care and support of older people who struggle with day-to-day activities in England during the period 2011 to 2013, using the data and insights from ‘The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population’. Part 1 of this report examines the reach of publicly funded support; the unmet need in the older population; and variation and consistency of care and support. Part 2 considers the implications of the Care Act implementation and looks at policy development beyond 2016, focusing on eligible needs after the Act, financial eligibility and the means test after 2016 and mapping, identifying and engaging older population groups. The report concludes that given the feasibility and budget challenges implied by the sheer numbers of older people experiencing difficulties with activities of daily living, a rethink and revolution is required among national and local policymakers around how individuals and families are engaged and supported. This will mean revisiting the balance between consistency and variation in services organised by local authorities, as well as fully integrating and exploiting the different ‘touch points’ and ‘gateways’ available for engaging the older population. It will also mean evaluating which aspects of the vision of the Care Act need to be fulfilled by local authorities directly, or can be devolved to empowered, third-party charities and organisations at a local level.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities


This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens


An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Results 11 - 20 of 25