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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'social care'

Results 21 - 25 of 25

Can online innovations enhance social care? Exploring the challenges of using digital technology to develop new models of support for older people

AYRES Shirley

Explores how the care sector can take advantage of the power and potential of digital technology and social networks to develop new models of support for older people. The effective use of digital technologies – based around the internet, computers, mobile phones, social networks, telecare and telehealth – are critical in enabling people to live more independent and fulfilling lives, irrespective of their health and care needs. This is especially true as the demand for care services increases. The paper, using a range of good practice examples, highlights the role of digital technology in alleviating social isolation, enabling access to information and knowledge and in supporting the lives and work of many carers around the UK. The paper calls for a better shared understanding of innovations in this sector, a more co-ordinated and coherent approach to enable carers and care seekers to easily access online information and support, greater shared learning, collaboration and partnerships, and the promotion of events that showcase digital technology innovations in care which could be adopted by local authorities, the NHS and housing providers, as well as being purchased by people funding their own support needs.

Prevention services, social care and older people: much discussed but little researched?

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research

A scoping study investigated approaches to prevention services in local authorities which enable older people to retain their independence for as long as possible to maintain their quality of life and reduce pressure on local authority and NHS budgets. The study involved a survey of Directors of Adult Social Services in 9 local authorities to identify what they viewed as their top 3 investments in prevention services for older people, and interviews with lead managers for each intervention. It also reviewed local and national evidence as to whether these interventions lead to a delay or reduction in uptake of social care services This paper summarises the key findings from the research. It explains that the top 3 interventions were reablement (a top 3 approach for all of the local authorities surveyed), technology-based interventions (among the top 3 interventions in 6 authorities), and information and advice (among the top 3 in 3 authorities), while a number of other prevention interventions were identified by one local authority each. It reports on how local authorities seek evidence and guidance on prevention services and factors influencing how local funding was spent, and on assessment of the outcomes and impact of prevention interventions. It also summarises national and local evidence for the top 3 interventions.

Ending the other care crisis: making the case for investment in preventative care and support for disabled adults

AIDEN Hardeep, BUSH Marc

A third of all people using care services are disabled adults of working age. This pamphlet builds on the analysis in 'The other care crisis', which provided evidence that exposed the £1.2 billion gap in social care spending for disabled adults. Based on new research undertaken by Deloitte, this pamphlet quantifies the long-term savings to individuals and the Government of closing this gap in social care expenditure. It recommends that the Government's Spending Review should commit to establishing a national minimum threshold for eligibility that encourages councils to provide social care to people with ‘moderate’ or equivalent level needs The Government should encourage councils and the NHS to jointly invest in preventative care and support through Health and Wellbeing Boards. The Care Bill should contain a duty on Health and Wellbeing Boards to identify, plan for and commission preventative services that maximise the independence of disabled people. This should be a statutory part of their Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Health and Wellbeing strategies. The pamphlet has been jointly produced by the National Autistic Society, Mencap, the Lenard Cheshire Disability, Sense, and Scope.

The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HIRANI Shashivadan Parbati, et al

Background: Home-based telecare (TC) is utilised to manage risks of independent living and provide prompt emergency responses. This study examined the effect of TC on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depressive symptoms over 12 months in patients receiving social care. Design: A study of participant-reported outcomes [the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Telecare Questionnaire Study; baseline n = 1,189] was nested in a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial of TC (the WSD Telecare trial), held across three English Local Authorities. General practice (GP) was the unit of randomisation and TC was compared with usual care (UC). Methods: Participant-reported outcome measures were collected at baseline, short-term (4 months) and long-term (12 months) follow-up, assessing generic HRQoL, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Primary intention-to-treat analyses tested treatment effectiveness and were conducted using multilevel models to control for GP clustering and covariates for participants who completed questionnaire measures at baseline assessment plus at least one other assessment (n = 873). Results: Analyses found significant differences between TC and UC on Short Form-12 mental component scores (P < 0.05), with parameter estimates indicating being a member of the TC trial-arm increases mental component scores (UC-adjusted mean = 40.52; TC-adjusted mean = 43.69). Additional significant analyses revealed, time effects on EQ5D (decreasing over time) and depressive symptoms (increasing over time). Conclusions: TC potentially contributes to the amelioration in the decline in users’ mental HRQoL over a 12-month period. TC may not transform the lives of its users, but it may afford small relative benefits on some psychological and HRQOL outcomes relative to users who only receive UC.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 21 - 25 of 25

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