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Results for 'social inclusion'

Results 1 - 10 of 17

Local authorities + older people + arts = a creative combination


This report presents the case for local authority involvement in arts projects for older people. It sets out the benefits of participation in the arts for older people, it also argues that arts projects have additional benefits which can help local authorities deliver their own objectives at a time of increasing financial cuts. The report highlights five roles and interests of local authorities that makes them uniquely well suited to promote arts in the lives of older people. These are: improving the health and well being of older people, including reducing loneliness; arts and cultural services; integrating arts into older people's services and social care; social inclusion and community development; and leadership and coordination. Six case studies are included to illustrate the work that can be led or supported by local authorities. These include using arts to promoting mental and physical well being in St Helens; tackling loneliness in Fife; the provision of arts and social care services in Epping Forest; and leadership and coordination in Manchester. It also highlights relevant organisations and resources.

Social prescribing: a review of community referral schemes


Sets the scene for the conditions under which social prescribing has arisen and considers the efficacy of different referral options. Social prescribing is a non-medical intervention linking patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local, non-clinical services. The review provides definitions, models and notable examples of social prescribing schemes and assesses the means by which and the extent to which these schemes have been evaluated. Models outlined in this review include: Arts on Prescription, Books on Prescription, Education on Prescription, Exercise on Prescription, Green Gyms, Healthy Living Initiatives, Information Prescriptions, Museums on Prescription, Social Enterprise Schemes, Supported Referral, and Time Banks. The report makes recommendations for practice, policy and future research, focusing on best practice guidance for sector workers, frameworks for setting up social prescribing schemes, and methods for evaluating social prescribing schemes.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities


This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities.

Community capital: the value of connected communities

PARSFIELD Matthew, et al

The final report of the Connected Communities for Mental Wellbeing and Social Inclusion programme, which looked at how different interventions can contribute to the development of resilient, inclusive communities with higher wellbeing. This report examines how interventions affect relationships and attitudes, and how relationships and attitudes affect individuals' and communities' ability to develop social value. The programme involved a survey residents in seven ward-sized localities, an analysis of the data for insight into local social networks and wellbeing, and work with local people to develop projects to support social connections. Results found that community-led action and targeted interventions can strengthen local communities and lead to substantial benefits. It is argued that by investing in interventions which build and strengthen networks of social relationships, four kinds of social value or ‘dividend’ shared by people in the community will develop: wellbeing, citizenship, capacity, and an economic dividend through improved employability and health.

Researching age-friendly communities: stories from older people as co-investigators


This guide evaluates the experience of involving older people in a research study that explored the age-friendliness of three areas of Manchester. It offers practical tips and critical reflections to help rethink how older people can be involved in research and social action to improve the physical and social environment of their neighbourhood. For the project a group 18 older residents were recruited and trained in designing interview questions, interviewing, data collection, and sharing the findings. The guide outlines the aims of the study, the methodology of the research and a summary of research activities undertaken. It then covers: what 'age-friendly means'; the co-researchers' motivations to participate in the study; the advantages and challenges of involving older residents; skills and knowledge acquired through the project; key findings; and suggested improvements to the age-friendliness of neighbourhoods. The guide includes contributions from older co-interviewers and representatives of community organisations who were involved in the project. The guide concludes by suggesting three principles for developing age-friendly neighbourhoods: that they should empower older people and enable social participation; they are a reminder about the rights of all citizens to full use of resources in their neighbourhood; and the importance of recognising both the social and physical dimensions which make up age-friendly communities.

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales


This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils


This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people


A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Singing for successful ageing: the perceived benefits of participating in the Golden Oldies community-arts programme


Community-based preventative programmes are increasing in demand as the UK seeks alternative ways of supporting the growing number of older adults. As the use and promotion of preventative programmes increase, so does the need for evidence supporting their effectiveness. Through the use of mixed methods, this study explored a singing community-arts programme, the Golden Oldies, to determine the extent to which the programme contributes to participants' (n = 120) sense of health, self-development and social connectedness. Quantitative analyses found that between 73.1 and 98.3 per cent of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the Golden Oldies contributed to their self-development, health and sense of community as well as revealing a statistically significant increase in self-reported health prior to participation in the programme to the time of the study. Qualitative analysis (n = 5) revealed three themes—the Golden Oldies as: (i) a reduction in social isolation and increase in social contact; (ii) a therapeutic source; and (iii) a new lease for life. The results provide evidence of the preventative nature of the Golden Oldies programme through self-reported improvements in health and social relationships where social connections appeared to be the important thread that contributed to the perceived benefits. Implications for policy, practice and research are discussed.

Rotherham Social Prescribing Scheme

Voluntary Action Rotherham

Voluntary Action Rotherham, on behalf of NHS Rotherham CCG, co-ordinates a social prescribing scheme which links patients with long term conditions in primary care and their carers with sources of non-medical support in their community. By connecting people with a range of voluntary and community sector-led interventions, such as exercise/mobility activities, community transport, befriending and peer mentoring, art and craft sessions, carer’s respite, (to name a few), the scheme aims to lead to improved social and clinical outcomes for people with long-term conditions and their carers; more cost-effective use of NHS and social care resources and to the development of a wider, more diverse range of local community services.

Results 1 - 10 of 17