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Results for 'surveys'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Come on time, slow down and smile: experiences of older people using home care services in the Bradford District: an independent report by Healthwatch Bradford and District

HEALTHWATCH BRADFORD AND DISTRICT

Summarises the findings of a study of people’s experiences of receiving care services in their home. The report is based on 240 responses from older people or their carers. It shows that: people value their home care service and recognise its importance in keeping them as independent as possible and enabling them to live at home; many respondents raised concerns about rushed visits, unpredictable and variable timings of care and missed visits; nearly half of respondents felt there was insufficient time and/or carers’ approach or skill level resulted in care needs not being met; service users rated the attitude and approach of staff overall as good and felt they were treated with dignity and respect but a high number of respondents made reference to poor communication and poor attitude of some care staff; there was a high recognition of lack of skills and training among some care staff; many respondents highlighted the need for the same care workers to visit regularly; overall support and effectiveness from the service generally received positive commentary. The report sets out recommendations for both home care providers and Bradford Council, calling for more choice, flexibility and a person centred approach that promotes the well-being and independence of individuals.

Safely home: what happens when people leave hospital and care settings?

HEALTHWATCH ENGLAND

Presents the findings from an inquiry into the emotional and physical impact of hospital discharge. With the help of 101 local Healthwatch, the enquiry panel heard from over 3,000 people who shared their stories about their experiences of the discharge process, focusing in particular on older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions. The findings reveal that there are five core reasons people feel their departure is not handled properly: people are experiencing delays and a lack of co-ordination between different services; they are feeling left without the services and support they need after discharge; they feel stigmatised and discriminated against and that they are not treated with appropriate respect because of their conditions and circumstances; they feel they are not involved in decisions about their care or given the information they need; and they feel that their full range of needs is not considered. The report includes examples of good practice and initiatives and projects designed to help older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions resolve the difficulties they experience during the discharge process.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

Measuring your impact on loneliness in later life

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS

This guidance offers information and advice on choosing and using a scale to measure the impact of services and interventions on loneliness in older age. A scale is simply a way of numerically measuring an opinion or emotion, and is one way to gather evidence about the effectiveness of a service. Using a scale enables service providers to ask about loneliness in a structured way – and produces numbers that can help illustrate how much of a difference they are making. In this guidance four different scales are described and evaluated and their strengths and limitations discussed. These are: the Campaign to End Loneliness Measurement Tool; the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale; the UCLA Loneliness Scale; and the single-item ‘scale’. The paper explains how to use a chosen scale, focusing on sampling for a survey, gaining informed consent, reducing bias, data collection, asking open, follow-up questions, and keeping personal information confidential.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Results 1 - 7 of 7

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