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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'training'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Health and digital: reducing inequalities, improving society. An evaluation of the Widening Digital Participation programme


Evaluation of the Tinder Foundation and NHS England Widening Digital Participation programme, which set out to improve the digital health skills of people in hard-to-reach communities in order to help them take charge of their own heath. It aimed to ensure that health inequalities resulting from digital exclusion do not become more pronounced. The programme involved: building a Digital Health Information network of local providers who provided face-to-face support to help people improve their skills; developing digital health information; supporting people to access health information online and learn how to complete digital medical transactions; and funding Innovation Pathfinder organisations to test innovative approaches to help people improve their digital health skills. This report evaluates the key figures and learning from the final year of the project and also provides a summary of the key findings across the three-year programme. It discusses the scale and impact of behaviour change on frontline services; priority audiences participating, including people with dementia and people with learning disabilities; and new models of care. The evaluation found that during the duration of the project 221,941 people were trained to use digital health resources. This has resulted in more people using the internet as their first port of call for information, and potential savings from reduced GP and A&E visits. The report estimates that the combined annual cost savings of reduced visits to GPs and A&E comes to approximately £6 millon against an NHS investment of £810,000 in year three.

Come on time, slow down and smile: experiences of older people using home care services in the Bradford District: an independent report by Healthwatch Bradford and District


Summarises the findings of a study of people’s experiences of receiving care services in their home. The report is based on 240 responses from older people or their carers. It shows that: people value their home care service and recognise its importance in keeping them as independent as possible and enabling them to live at home; many respondents raised concerns about rushed visits, unpredictable and variable timings of care and missed visits; nearly half of respondents felt there was insufficient time and/or carers’ approach or skill level resulted in care needs not being met; service users rated the attitude and approach of staff overall as good and felt they were treated with dignity and respect but a high number of respondents made reference to poor communication and poor attitude of some care staff; there was a high recognition of lack of skills and training among some care staff; many respondents highlighted the need for the same care workers to visit regularly; overall support and effectiveness from the service generally received positive commentary. The report sets out recommendations for both home care providers and Bradford Council, calling for more choice, flexibility and a person centred approach that promotes the well-being and independence of individuals.

Supporting self-management: summarising evidence from systematic reviews


This booklet sets out research findings of the benefits of supporting people to self-manage. It also sets out the evidence for the impact of self-management education for patients, proactive telephone and psychosocial support, home-based self-monitoring and simplified dosing strategies and information. Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage their own healthcare independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system. People feel more confident and engaged when they are encouraged to self-manage by professionals, therefore supporting self-management is key to prioritising person-centred care. Drawing on the findings from 228 systematic reviews, the paper concludes that the top three things that might most usefully be invested in are disease specific, generic and on-line self-management courses, proactive telephone support and self monitoring of symptoms and vital signs.

Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care: evidence update March 2015


Summarises selected new evidence published since the original literature search was conducted for the NICE guidance 16 Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care (2008). A search was conducted for new evidence from 1 June 2011 to 28 July 2014 and a total of 8,973 pieces of evidence were initially identified. The 21 most relevant references underwent a critical appraisal process and then were reviewed by an Evidence Update Advisory Group, which advised on the final list of 6 items selected for the Evidence Update. The update provides detailed commentaries on the new evidence focussing on the following themes: occupational interventions, physical activity, walking schemes, and training. It also highlights evidence uncertainties identified.

Results 1 - 4 of 4