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Results for 'voluntary organisations'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND, NHS ENGLAND

This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE

Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

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