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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'voluntary sector'

Results 21 - 26 of 26

Prevention matters: delivering a prevention-focused model for adult services in Buckinghamshire County Council


Sets out a prevention-focused model of adult health and social care services which place emphasis on maintaining people’s independence and resilience; preventing deterioration into substantial or critical categories of need. The document outlines the current system challenges, the existing lack of joint working between sectors and services, a reactive approach to creating support services and networks and a lack of confidence or capacity to innovate and invest in prevention without an evidence base or business case. It then presents a framework for building the evidence for investment in prevention, proposing a measurement methodology and a definition of the target user group and of outcomes and impact. The document puts forward a new prevention-orientated service model, identifying the high‐level functions, which are shared by different agents and delivery mechanisms, on which the model rests. These are: intelligence and knowledge about the effectiveness of prevention‐related activities, bridging and building networks between formal and informal service delivery, connecting people, maximising existing resources and motivating and enabling. The document examines the core components of the model, which include an intelligence hub, a volunteer hub, community links officers, and community prevention officers. Funding and implementation considerations are also included.

Singing from the same hymn sheet? commissioning of preventative services from the third sector

MILLER Robin, et al

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the delivery of preventative services for older people from third sector organisations (TSOs) and the extent to which current commissioning arrangements enables the aspirations of policy to be achieved. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with key-contacts within a sample of TSOs which had been identified by directors of Adult Social Services as delivering one of the top three preventative interventions in their local authority area. Findings: There was evidence of considerable trust between local authorities and TSOs and as a consequence TSOs were given autonomy to develop holistic and integrated models of delivery that supported rather than diverted the TSOs’ core missions. Both sectors found it difficult to set target outcomes and connected performance frameworks for preventative services. As a consequence a major element of the commissioning cycle is not being completed and TSOs cannot be confident that they are using their resources as effectively as possible. Research limitations/implications: This study was based in one English region, and would benefit from being extended to other English regions and home nations. Practical implications: Universities, policy makers, commissioners and the third sector need to work together to develop common outcome frameworks for preventative services and to gather consistent data sets that can be more easily synthesised to give a “realistic” understanding of the impact of different interventions and delivery models. Originality value: The paper contributes to the limited evidence bases of commissioning of TSOs and preventative services.

Taking stock: assessing the value of preventative support


The aim of this report is to illustrate how British Red Cross preventative services providing time-limited practical and emotional support deliver savings for public sector partners including the NHS and local authorities. It presents brief case studies of 5 people who received personalised support from British Red Cross staff and volunteers to help them live independently in their communities. In each case it describes the action taken and the impact of the services and support provided. It includes an independent economic analysis of each case study assessing the costs which could have been incurred by statutory services in delivering care in the absence of the British Red Cross services. It reports that savings of between £700 and over £10,000 were delivered per person, and that this reflects a minimum return on investment of over 3.5 times the cost of the British Red Cross service provided.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross


This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Exploring the difference made by Support at home

JOY Sarah, CORRAL Susana, NZEGWU Femi

An evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home services, which provide time-limited care and support to people at a time of crisis who are finding it difficult to cope at home. Overall the research highlighted that the common area of major impact of Support at Home is the enhancement of service users’ quality of life. The support provided is characterised by a strong sense of trust by service users in the Red Cross brand alongside a compassionate, caring, non-judgemental, time-flexible and person-enabling approach. In particular, the findings show that four service user outcomes were significantly improved or increased following receipt of support. These include: improved wellbeing; increased ability to manage daily activities; increase in leisure activities; and improved coping skills. Other positive changes were also reported related to the wider benefits of the service beyond the service user outcomes alone, including enabling safe discharge, supporting carers and enabling patient advocacy. The report identifies a series of action points to help further develop the services: champion Red Cross strengths, respond to the changing profile of service users, develop active partnerships to extend reach and maximise impact, clarify the Red Cross’ position for people in need who fall outside of commissioned contracts, collect consistent and routine local and national data to inform service learning and development, develop signposting to ensure long-term impact and grow skills in order to advocate on behalf of service users.

Older people’s prevention services: comparing perspectives of local authorities and the third sector


Third sector organisations (TSOs) have historically played a significant role in the delivery of adult social care. Often seen to be associated with qualities such as strong community links, access to disadvantaged groups and innovative practice, TSOs remain a popular choice with local authority commissioners as providers of preventative services. This study explored the views of nine locally commissioned TSOs and two national organisations which provide preventative services for older people. Senior managers were interviewed about their views of the purpose of such services, how the TSO understood their impacts, and their experience of being commissioned by the public sector. The results were added to previous research with local authorities to build a picture of the local authority and third sector relationship. The research identifies positive aspects within the current arrangements, but also gaps in respect of setting and understanding of outcomes and a reliance on personal relationships within the commissioning process.

Results 21 - 26 of 26