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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 1 - 10 of 287

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

Evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service: final report

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An independent evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service, which is delivered in partnership by Crossroads Care Rotherham, Rotherham and Doncaster Alzheimer's Society and Age UK Rotherham on behalf of NHS Rotherham Clinical Commissioning Group. The service provides information, advice and practical support to help carers of people living with dementia to care for the person with dementia at home for as long as possible. The evaluation looked at the impact of the service on carer health and well-being, the effect on patient and carer use of NHS care and resources, and views on the effectiveness of the service. It included interviews with stakeholders including five service staff, one GP, and one representative of the CCG; and questionnaires and interviews with carers using the service; and three in-depth client case studies. The evaluation reports that the service reached more than 330 carers during its first year, from February 2015 to March 2016. Successes of the service included linking carers in to other services from the statutory, voluntary and community sector; providing carers information about benefits entitlements; and access to home based support services. The service was highly valued by beneficiaries and there was evidence for improvement in key outcome measures. These included small numbers of carers reporting better general well-being, better health and improvements in their carer quality of life. There was insufficient evidence to confirm whether the service had reduced the demand for emergency care.

Peer support in accommodation based support services: a social return on investment

NEWTON Angela, WOMER Jessica, WHATMOUGH Suzy
2017

This evaluation assessed the peer support delivered across three accommodation services in Hampshire to understand the ways in which it impacted people’s lives and what they valued most about it. The services provided support for people experiencing mental distress, many of who had multiple complex needs. A total of 12 volunteers delivered peer support both on-to-one support and group peer support. A total of 22 people completed questionnaires for the evaluation, which included 12 services users (71 per cent of all service users who had used peer support), and 10 Peer Supporters (83 per cent of all Peer Supporters). Costs of providing peer support and the number of hours of direct support provided by peer supporters were also collected. From this, the return on investment in peer support was calculated using a methodology for measuring the equivalent worth of activity in social terms. The results found that the majority of peer supporters and service users who took part in the study had improved levels of confidence, felt more able to manage their mental health; had an improved social life and support network; felt more accepted; and felt more hopeful about the future. It also calculated that every pound spent on peer support provided a social return worth £4.94. The findings demonstrate that peer support is valued by those involved and helps support people to achieve their outcomes and lead more independent and fulfilling lives. The results of the study will also help communicate the value of peer support in financial terms to with commissioners and funders.

The Government’s response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2017

This report sets out the Government’s response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health report by the Mental Health Taskforce. While accepting the taskforce report’s recommendations in full, this document sets out a far-reaching programme of work to improve mental health services and their links to other public services, and builds mental health prevention and response into the work of Government departments to improve the nation’s mental health and reduce the impacts of mental illness. Key areas covered include: local offer to children and young people; multi-agency suicide prevention plans; tackling alcoholism and drug addiction; access to psychological therapies; improving mental health and employment outcomes; specialist housing support for vulnerable people with mental health problems; behaviour change interventions; developing a complete health and justice pathway to deliver integrated health and justice interventions in the least restrictive setting; developing a 10-year strategy for mental health research; ensuring future updates to the Better Care Fund include mental health and social work services; ensuring GPs receive core mental health training and that the social care workforce is ready to provide high quality social work services in mental health; and ensuring accurate data collation and data sharing.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

The impact of faith-based organisations on public health and social capital

NOVEMBER Lucy
2014

Summarises research evidence on the relationship between faith and health, and on the role of faith communities in improving health and reducing health inequalities. It also provides an overview of faith the the UK and the health problems prevalent within different ethnic and faith communities. The literature was identified through searches carried out on a range of databases and organisational websites, and was structured into two ‘strands’. Strand one looks at how faith based organisations represent communities with poor health outcomes, and provide an opportunity for public health services to access these ‘hard to reach’ groups. Strand two looks at how the social and spiritual capital gained by belonging to a faith community can result in physical and mental health benefits and mitigate other determinants of poor health. Findings from the review included that regular engagement in religious activities is positively related to various aspects of wellbeing, and negatively associated with depressive symptoms. There was also evidence to show that volunteering can positively affect the health and wellbeing of volunteers, and that faith communities represent a large proportion of national volunteering. The report provides recommendations for faith-based organisations and public health bodies, on how they might work effectively in partnership to realise the potential for faith groups of improving health and wellbeing.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Reducing delayed transfer of care through housing interventions: evidence of impact. Case study

ADAMS Sue
2016

A case study and independent evaluation of a housing intervention designed to help older patients to return home from hospital more rapidly and safety. The initiative is delivered by West of England Care & Repair (WE C&R), who organise clutter clearance/deep cleaning; urgent home repairs, emergency heating repairs and essential housing adaptations for older people in hospital. The evaluation examined all case records, interviewed 15 hospital staff and undertook an in depth analysis of a sample of 4 cases. Analysis of the case records estimated a saving in hospital bed days of £13,526. The cost of housing interventions was £948, resulting in a cost benefit ratio of 14:1. Additional savings in hospital staff time amounted to a further £897. A short case study illustrates how the service was able to help one woman return home from hospital. It concludes that the small scale evaluation is indicative of the potential savings that a practical and effective home from hospital housing intervention service can generate for the health service.

Policy briefing: music, singing and wellbeing in adults with diagnosed conditions or dementia

WHAT WORKS WELLBEING
2016

Drawing on the available evidence, this briefing examines what music and singing interventions work to improve wellbeing of adults living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. While there is ample evidence looking at the impact of music and singing on clinical outcomes such as pain management, coping with hospitalisation, coping with symptoms and managing symptoms of dementia, this new evidence focuses on wellbeing for those living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. Specifically, it focuses on self-reported measures of quality of life; life satisfaction; and anxiety or depression. The paper suggests that there is strong evidence that brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings and initial evidence that music therapy can contribute to improved spiritual wellbeing in hospice patients. There is strong evidence targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment and initial evidence that music therapy can alleviate anxiety in undergraduate students. There is promising evidence that targeted, culturally relevant music and singing interventions can enhance mental wellbeing and decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings and initial evidence that participation in individual personalised music listening sessions can reduce anxiety and/or depression in nursing home residents with dementia and that listening to music may enhance overall wellbeing for adults with dementia. There is initial evidence that participation in extended community singing programmes can improve quality of life and social and emotional wellbeing in adults living with chronic conditions.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Results 1 - 10 of 287

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