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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 121 - 130 of 313

The role of case studies as evidence in public health

KORJONEN Helena, et al
2016

This study uses a mixed methods approach, comprising a literature review, a content analysis of a sample of case studies and a small number of qualitative interviews on the use and usefulness of case studies, to define, explore and make recommendations around the nature and use of case studies in public health. It suggests that case studies capture local knowledge of programmes and services, and illustrate processes and outcomes that cannot be captured in other ways, and that this is what makes them valuable. The report argues that case studies would benefit from guidelines and templates to improve the format, replicability and assessment and that they would benefit from a higher rating in evidence hierarchies as they often describe complex interventions, implementation and different contexts.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND
2015

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
2014

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities.

Measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people

BRYANT Gillian, HEARD Heather, WATSON Jo
2015

This document outlines the importance of measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people. It is intended to provide guidance on the use of targeted, evidence driven intelligence and practical support to those wishing to develop local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the evaluation of interventions which improve the mental wellbeing of children and young people. In particular, the briefing examines what children and young people’s mental wellbeing is, and why is it important; it describes some of the tools which are currently available to measure mental wellbeing and identify its determinants; it discusses risk and protective factors; and explains how using intelligence can improve children and young people’s outcomes. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew
2015

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Growing healthy communities: the Health and Wellbeing Index

GRANT THORNTON UK LLP
2015

This report highlights the extent to which economic, social and environmental determinants translate to good or bad health outcomes in their broadest sense. It also shows the scale and nature of inequality across the country and reiterates the need for a local, place-based approach to tackling health outcomes. The report is based on league tables that assess 33 key health determinants and outcomes at local authority district level. The analysis reveals that the top three determinants that most strongly correlate to health outcomes are child poverty, deprivation and unemployment. Crime ranks as only seventh strongest with childhood education, social cohesions and occupations all proven as having a bigger impact on overall health outcomes. Case studies from Barnet, Greenwich and Richmond and Kingston outline some of the lessons that can be learnt from these and where collaboration has been seen to address an area’s determinants to improve health outcomes. That nine of the ten fall within London, where the boundaries of health commissioning are coterminous with those of the local authority may imply more readily facilitated joint-working leading to improved outcomes.

Building the right support: a national plan to develop community services and close inpatient facilities for people with learning disability...including those with a mental health condition

NHS ENGLAND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

Sets out a national plan to enable people with learning disabilities who display behaviour that challenges to be supported to live more independently in their local community and reduce reliance on institutional care and long stay hospitals. The plan looks at the learning from the six 'fast track' areas; describes the new services that will be needed to better support people with learning disabilities to live in the community; and outlines how transforming care partnerships (commissioning collaborations of local authorities, CCGs and NHS England partners) in health and care will need to work together to deliver these changes. Areas discussed include: the need for appropriate local housing, such as schemes where people have their own home but ready access to on-site support staff; an expansion of the use of personal budgets, enabling people and their families to plan their own care, beyond those who already have a legal right to them; for people to have access to a local care and support navigator or key worker; and investment in advocacy and advice services run by local charities and voluntary organisations. To achieve the shift from inpatient to community-based services the plan identifies three key changes: that local councils and NHS bodies will join together to deliver better and more coordinated services; pooled budgets between the NHS and local councils to ensure the right care is provided in the right place; and adoption of a new service model.

Peer support for people with dementia resource pack: promoting peer support opportunities for people with dementia

HEALTH INNOVATION NETWORK SOUTH LONDON
2015

Bringing together examples of good practice and evidence-based guidance, the pack aims to help groups and organisations better support people with dementia in their communities. The pack was developed in partnership with leading dementia and older people charities, with contributions from Innovations in Dementia, The Alzheimer’s Society, AGE UK and Mental Health Foundation. The Health Innovation Network dementia team worked with people with dementia across south London to provide case studies and contribute to the films within the pack. The guide includes: information about what peer support is and how different types of groups can support people with dementia; why peer support can help people with dementia stay connected with their communities; guidance and resources to help people who want to run groups for or including people with dementia; and some ideas for how to tell if the group is doing well.

Results 121 - 130 of 313

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