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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 161 - 170 of 313

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy
2011

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Unleashing the power of digital communications: revolutionising housing with care with life enhancing technologies

ROGAN Ali
2015

This paper looks at how technology can be used to help deliver good housing, care and support. It summarises the results from an online survey and workshop held with the South West Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network) leadership. It looks at what can be achieved when technology is implemented well and the looks at the challenges, barriers to adoption and ways to overcome the barriers. Four main barriers to the deployment of technology emerged from the workshop: culture; awareness; leadership, commissioning and procurement; and budgets. Suggestions put forward to help break down these barriers include: adopting a phased introduction of new ways of working; adopt a range of flexible funding options; good communication with stakeholders which involves them in the process early on; and using technology as one part of an integrated approach. Some case study examples are also presented as a bulleted list.

Researching age-friendly communities: stories from older people as co-investigators

BUFFEL Tine
2015

This guide evaluates the experience of involving older people in a research study that explored the age-friendliness of three areas of Manchester. It offers practical tips and critical reflections to help rethink how older people can be involved in research and social action to improve the physical and social environment of their neighbourhood. For the project a group 18 older residents were recruited and trained in designing interview questions, interviewing, data collection, and sharing the findings. The guide outlines the aims of the study, the methodology of the research and a summary of research activities undertaken. It then covers: what 'age-friendly means'; the co-researchers' motivations to participate in the study; the advantages and challenges of involving older residents; skills and knowledge acquired through the project; key findings; and suggested improvements to the age-friendliness of neighbourhoods. The guide includes contributions from older co-interviewers and representatives of community organisations who were involved in the project. The guide concludes by suggesting three principles for developing age-friendly neighbourhoods: that they should empower older people and enable social participation; they are a reminder about the rights of all citizens to full use of resources in their neighbourhood; and the importance of recognising both the social and physical dimensions which make up age-friendly communities.

Come on time, slow down and smile: experiences of older people using home care services in the Bradford District: an independent report by Healthwatch Bradford and District

HEALTHWATCH BRADFORD AND DISTRICT
2015

Summarises the findings of a study of people’s experiences of receiving care services in their home. The report is based on 240 responses from older people or their carers. It shows that: people value their home care service and recognise its importance in keeping them as independent as possible and enabling them to live at home; many respondents raised concerns about rushed visits, unpredictable and variable timings of care and missed visits; nearly half of respondents felt there was insufficient time and/or carers’ approach or skill level resulted in care needs not being met; service users rated the attitude and approach of staff overall as good and felt they were treated with dignity and respect but a high number of respondents made reference to poor communication and poor attitude of some care staff; there was a high recognition of lack of skills and training among some care staff; many respondents highlighted the need for the same care workers to visit regularly; overall support and effectiveness from the service generally received positive commentary. The report sets out recommendations for both home care providers and Bradford Council, calling for more choice, flexibility and a person centred approach that promotes the well-being and independence of individuals.

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales

BROAD Ralph
2015

This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Joint review of investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, et al
2015

This report summarises the initial findings of a review developed in co-production with the statutory and voluntary sectors, exploring how the sector could: maximise and demonstrate its impact; build sustainability and capacity; promote equality and address health inequalities. From January to March 2015 around 4,500 people and organisations were consulted, sharing their views on the current state of the statutory and VCSE sectors, the key challenges they face, including reduced funding, and the potential of the sector, particularly in relation to equality and health inequalities, prevention and resilience, and personalisation and co-production.

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi
2015

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

Safely home: what happens when people leave hospital and care settings?

HEALTHWATCH ENGLAND
2015

Presents the findings from an inquiry into the emotional and physical impact of hospital discharge. With the help of 101 local Healthwatch, the enquiry panel heard from over 3,000 people who shared their stories about their experiences of the discharge process, focusing in particular on older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions. The findings reveal that there are five core reasons people feel their departure is not handled properly: people are experiencing delays and a lack of co-ordination between different services; they are feeling left without the services and support they need after discharge; they feel stigmatised and discriminated against and that they are not treated with appropriate respect because of their conditions and circumstances; they feel they are not involved in decisions about their care or given the information they need; and they feel that their full range of needs is not considered. The report includes examples of good practice and initiatives and projects designed to help older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions resolve the difficulties they experience during the discharge process.

Results 161 - 170 of 313

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