#EXCLUDE#

SCIE uses cookies to store information on your computer. This information is used to make parts of the site work and so we can understand how the site is used. If you have used some parts of the site, or have registered for a MySCIE account, a cookie will have already been set.

To find out more about why we use cookies and for information on how to delete and block cookies from this site, please visit our cookies page.

  I accept cookies from this site.

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 11 - 20 of 266

The homecare deficit 2016: a report on the funding of older people’s homecare across the United Kingdom

UNITED KINGDOM HOMECARE ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on data obtained from freedom of information requests, this report analyses average prices paid by councils for home care services across all four administrations of the United Kingdom. It also provides a breakdown by England’s nine government regions. The data were obtained during a sample week in April 2016 following the introduction of the new National Living Wage. The analysis found that only one in ten authorities paid an average price at or above UKHCA’s minimum price of £16.70 per hour. It also found that seven authorities paid average prices which the UKHCA believe are unlikely even to cover care workers’ wages and on-costs of £11.94 per hour. Only 24 councils had completed calculations for the costs of home care. The report highlights the low rates that many councils are paying independent and voluntary homecare providers. It argues that this underfunding is a root cause of the instability of local homecare markets and the low pay and conditions of the homecare workforce. The analysis also exposes the level of risk that councils place on a system intended to support older and disabled people. The report makes a number of recommendations, which include the need for local authorities to provide calculations of their costs of homecare.

Local authorities + older people + arts = a creative combination

CUTLER David
2013

This report presents the case for local authority involvement in arts projects for older people. It sets out the benefits of participation in the arts for older people, it also argues that arts projects have additional benefits which can help local authorities deliver their own objectives at a time of increasing financial cuts. The report highlights five roles and interests of local authorities that makes them uniquely well suited to promote arts in the lives of older people. These are: improving the health and well being of older people, including reducing loneliness; arts and cultural services; integrating arts into older people's services and social care; social inclusion and community development; and leadership and coordination. Six case studies are included to illustrate the work that can be led or supported by local authorities. These include using arts to promoting mental and physical well being in St Helens; tackling loneliness in Fife; the provision of arts and social care services in Epping Forest; and leadership and coordination in Manchester. It also highlights relevant organisations and resources.

Making it happen: take action to get people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour out of inpatient units. A guide for campaigners about Transforming Care Partnerships

MENCAP, CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR FOUNDATION, NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY
2016

Guide to help local groups and individuals campaign for change to enable people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour to move from inpatient units into the community. The guide highlights NHS England's promise in 'Building the Right Support' to close 35-50 per cent of inpatient beds and develop the right support in the communities by March 2019. It sets out the scale of the challenge and outlines the role of the 48 Transforming Care Partnerships, set up to implement NHS England's plans. The guide then provides advice on how campaigning groups and individuals can contact local Transforming Care Partnerships to find out more about their plans and find out what is being done to develop the right support. It includes a template letter to help contact local Partnerships; a checklist of key principles that should be included in Transforming Care Partnership plans; and a list organisations that can provide further support.

North and South London Cares. Evaluation and development through the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

RENAISI
2016

This report presents the findings from research and impact measurement of key projects undertaken by the North London Cares and South London Cares, demonstrating how the charities meet their core objectives of reducing isolation and loneliness amongst older people (and young professionals alike); improving the wellbeing, skills, resilience and connection of all participants; and bridging social and generational divides. The main projects comprise: Love Your Neighbour, supporting one-to-one friendships across social and generational divides; Social Clubs, aimed at older people who can still get out of the house, and want to interact with other older neighbours as well as local young people; Winter Wellbeing, a pro-active outreach effort that helps older neighbours to stay warm, active, healthy and connected during the most isolating time of year; and Community Fundraising, involving volunteers in major community fundraising effort through a ‘networked approach’. Drawing from the responses to a survey of new members (and follow up surveys), the report shows that there were little change for the scores for wellbeing for those who answered all surveys, except for an increase in anxiety. When looking at all responses, regardless of whether they stayed in contact for 12 months, the happiness score appears to be increasing, suggesting that some of those who were least happy dropped out of the survey. In the loneliness questions there was a decrease in the computed social loneliness score (questions about other people), but an increase in the emotional loneliness (questions about their sense of loneliness). The report also develops a new theory of change for the organisation, and sets out how to go about measuring impact against theory. The theory is based on five outcomes, which apply equally to both volunteers and older neighbours, and include: reducing isolation, improving wellbeing, increasing the feeling of belonging in the local community, living richer lives, and building bridges across social and generational divides.

Kinder communities: the power of everyday relationships

FERGUSON Zoe
2016

This discussion paper explores the evidence on the impact of everyday relationships and kindness on individual and societal wellbeing, and community empowerment, and develops a theory of change. The paper sets out what maintaining connections and acting in kindness means and how these relate to concepts such as social capital, ‘random acts of kindness’, resilience, isolation and loneliness. Drawing on the evidence, it explains why kinder communities are important, what are the enablers and barriers, and what is happening currently to strengthen everyday relationships and kinder communities, focusing on community development, interface with public services, building connections, assets based approaches and individual psychology. The paper includes seven case studies providing examples of good practice.

An exploration of the evidence system of UK mental health charities

BUCKLAND Leonora, FIENNES Caroline
2016

To investigate what may need to happen to help mental health charities make more evidence-informed decisions, this report examines how UK charities delivering mental health services currently produce, synthesise, disseminate and use evidence within their organisation. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 12 mental health service delivery charities of varying sizes and qualitative interviews with four mental health sector experts were carried out. The project used an inclusive definition of evidence comprising: evaluation evidence, user feedback; practitioner evidence and contextual evidence (e.g., research into the prevalence or type of need). In relation to the production of evidence, the report found that mental health charities have focused primarily on producing practitioner and stakeholder evidence. Although larger charities are beginning to carry out more evaluation research, lack of resources remain a problem. It also identified little evidence produced by the charities interviewed being routinely synthesised or included in systematic reviews; weak dissemination channels; and little use of third-party evidence when making decisions. Although the number of charities interviewed was small, the report identifies some important gaps including: the need for more rigorous evaluation research about the effectiveness of charities’ interventions; the potential to make more use of existing the academic literature; and, for more evidence to be actively disseminated within the sector to enable greater learning. Recommendations to improve evidence systems are also included.

Support from the start: commissioning early intervention services for mental ill health

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Presents four case studies to show how Clinical Commissioning Groups and their partners are commissioning early intervention initiatives in mental health services. The case studies cover: Hounslow’s Friends for Life programme, which is helping to boost the resilience of young people; Salford’s early intervention in psychosis; Coventry and Warwickshire’s maternal mental health service; Kernow’s suicide liaison service. The case studies outline progress to date and highlight the value of the intervention. The paper also provides six top tips for commissioners early intervention services in mental health.

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT
2016

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren
2016

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

Access to outdoor recreation by older people in Scotland

COLLEY Kathryn, et al
2016

Scottish research study to examine the barriers preventing older people, including older people with long-term health conditions and disabilities, from accessing outdoor recreation opportunities. The research involved two stages: an investigation of the spatial distribution of older people using small-scale geographical units and semi-structured interviews with 27 older people across three case study sites of varying levels of urbanity and access to different types of green/blue natural resources. Results from the spatial distribution analysis found that remote areas and isolated small towns had higher concentrations of older people and older people with health problems or disabilities. It also identifies that the negative impacts on the well-being and resilience of local communities are also likely to be stronger in remote areas, with challenges in accessing medical and care facilities. The case study work found the barriers to participation in outdoor recreation by older people are multiple and inter-related. Key categories of barriers identified in the interviews were: poor health and (im)mobility; lack of or reduced social connections; fragility and vulnerability; lack of motivation and time commitments; safety; and weather and season. Key implications for policy and practice identified from the research include: for interventions to address the multiple and interrelated barriers preventing older people from participating in outdoor recreation, using integrated and holistic approaches involving different organisations; for ‘green prescribing’ by doctors and medical professionals to be integrated with existing initiatives (eg walking groups) which offer opportunities for overcoming social and motivational barriers; and for interventions to identify ways of providing transport access to outdoor spaces to older people.

Results 11 - 20 of 266

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

Enhanced health in care homes - videos

New NHS England videos on learning from enhanced health in care home vanguards
View more: News
Training course

Care Act – Info & Advice

CPD-accredited course on providing info & advice under Care Act
View more: Training courses
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#