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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 11 - 20 of 287

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Volunteering and social action and the Care Act: an opportunity for local government

VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2016

This paper provides advice and guidance for councillors and chief officers to help them respond to the Care Act 2014 by working together with partners in their local communities to develop volunteering and social action. The paper identifies Care Act duties placed on local government and partner organisation, which are to promote wellbeing; prevent reduce or delay needs by building on the resources of the local community; the provision of information and advice; and shaping a diverse and sustainable local market of providers for care and support. It then highlights the role volunteering can play in helping to fulfil these duties; why the VCSE sector is a useful partner for local authorities seeking to deliver their Care Act responsibilities; and identifies Care Act duties where volunteers can make a contribution. It also identifies shared features of initiatives which are effective building community capacity and promoting voluntary action. These are that they are co-produced, respond to local context, human in scale, strength-based; build in learning; build in sustainability; and adaptive, able to learn from their experience. It concludes with the challenges that need to be addressed to make the most of community capacity and build services which are ‘prevention-focused’. These are to provide community leadership and strategic direction; replicate and scale up good practice; prioritisation versus competing demands; commissioning practice; facilitate choice and control through micro-commissioning; supplement not displace paid work; and measure the impact of volunteering. Includes links to additional resources and sources of information.

Warm, safe and well: the evaluation of the Warm at Home programme

BENNETT Ellen, et al
2016

This report presents the findings from an evaluation of the Foundations Independent Living Trust Ltd (FILT) SSE Warm at Home (WAH) Programme. The programme, whose funding came via a financial penalty (or redress payment) imposed by the energy regulator Ofgem on the energy company SSE, provided funds to enable the homes of vulnerable householders to become more energy efficient and/or easier to keep warm, addressing the negative impact that fuel poverty and cold homes have on the physical and mental health of both adults and children. Funds were channelled through HIAs operating across England. The funding enabled HIAs to provide energy efficiency advice and warm homes-related practical interventions to their clients (new and existing), typically older homeowners with a long-term illness or disability and/or on a low income. The report indicates that improvements in health and wellbeing were reported once work had been completed. The greatest health and wellbeing improvements were experienced by those who received heating installation or replacement, and for those whom the highest cost work (£1,000 or more) was undertaken. Overall the WAH Programme appears to be a cost-effective intervention from a health perspective but there are variations in relation to the type and cost of intervention. The Programme is estimated to have led to an additional 121.8 QALYs. If the assumed total QALY gained across the whole Programme is converted into a monetary value using the NHS threshold of £20,000, then the value of the benefits gained amounts to £2,436,000. For every £1 of the £637,000 funding distributed to vulnerable households, the WAH Programme produced almost £4 of benefits in terms of better health.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

The benefits of making a contribution to your community in later life

JONES Dan, YOUNG Aideen, REEDER Neil
2016

Reviews existing evidence on the benefits for older people of volunteering and making unpaid contributions to their communities in later life. The report covers ‘community contributions’ to refer to this whole spectrum of unpaid activity, including individual acts of neighbourliness, peer support, formal volunteering and involvement in civic participation. The report looks the state of the current evidence base; the main areas of benefit for volunteering in later life, who currently benefits from volunteering and in what circumstances. The review identifies good evidence that older people making community contributions can lead to benefits in: the quantity and quality of their social connections; an enhanced sense of purpose and self-esteem; and improved life satisfaction, happiness and wellbeing. The evidence was less clear on the impact on health, employment and social isolation. The review also found that people aged 50 with fewer social connections, lower levels of income and education, and poorer health may have the most to gain from helping others. However, the people most likely to volunteer are those who are already relatively wealthy, in good physical and mental health, and with high levels of wellbeing and social connections. The report makes recommendations for organisations, funders and commissioners working with older volunteers. These included: maximise the benefits of volunteering by focusing on engaging older people who are relatively less well connected, less wealthy and less healthy; avoid an over reliance on volunteering alone to tackle serious issues related to physical health, frailty, social isolation or employability; and ensure that older people engaged in volunteering have meaningful roles, with opportunities for social interaction.

Conceptualizing spirituality and religion for mental health practice: perspectives of consumers with serious mental illness

STARNINO Vincent R.
2016

Studies show that a high percentage of people with serious mental illness (SMI) draw upon spirituality and religion, resulting in a call for practitioners to incorporate these as part of recovery-related services. A challenge is that there are differing definitions of spirituality and religion presented in the literature which could lead to confusion in practice settings. A qualitative study was conducted with 18 participants with SMI. Findings reveal that there are important nuances, and much overlap, related to how people with psychiatric disabilities define and conceptualize spirituality and religion. Three major conceptualisations of spirituality and religion are presented. Insights from this study are relevant to practitioners interested in incorporating spirituality as part of recovery-oriented practice.

Trapped in a bubble: an investigation into triggers for loneliness in the UK

CO-OPERATIVES UK, BRITISH RED CROSS
2016

This research investigates potential triggers for loneliness across life stages, focusing on the causes, experiences and impacts of loneliness for six selected groups. It also looks at the support available for people experiencing loneliness, the services people would like, and how they would like that support to be delivered. The research focuses on: young new mums; individuals with mobility limitations; individuals with health issues; individuals who are recently divorced or separated; individuals living without children at home ('empty-nesters') and retirees; and the recently bereaved. It also draws on the views of experts and public opinion on loneliness gathered through a survey. The research found that the causes of loneliness of often complex, stemming from a combination of personal, community, and UK-wide factors. It also confirmed that people experiencing life events which can disrupt existing connections or change their role in society are at risk of loneliness. Other factors contributing to loneliness included: difficulty in accessing statutory services and support, the rapid disappearance of social spaces, and inadequate transport infrastructure. Loneliness can have physical, psychological and social impacts which can negatively impact on communities and people’s ability to connect. Experts recommend a combination of the following three models of support to tackle loneliness, depending on individual circumstances: preventative; responsive, which is shaped by the needs of those already experiencing loneliness and restorative, helping people to rebuild connections and prevent people slipping into chronic loneliness. Participants experiencing loneliness had a preference for face-to-face services, with digital services seen as important but supplementary. All those involved in the research supported the need for small, personal steps to help build community connectedness.

Results 11 - 20 of 287

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