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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 221 - 230 of 313

Avoiding unhappy returns: radical reductions in readmissions, achieved with volunteers

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

A summary of the achievements of the Royal Voluntary Service Hospital 2 Home service during its first year. Leicestershire County Council launched the scheme in hospitals in six districts, including the three university hospitals in Leicester in summer 2012. The service provides practical help and support following a discharge from hospital; helps users to regain confidence and reduce anxiety; reduces social isolation; promotes independent living and choice; helps users to maintain day to day activities; provides information/signpost to other organisations; and helps prevent readmissions to hospital. Designed to be short-term, friendly and confidential and people-centred, the service is provided free of charge and is normally available for up to six weeks. Over 600 people have been referred. Among the participants readmission rates to hospital have been very low, with readmissions of older people approximately half national rates.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al
2010

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation in older people

COLLINS Emma
2014

This Insight looks specifically at the prevention of isolation and loneliness amongst older people, with a particular focus on what practitioners in the fields of health and social care should bear in mind when working to tackle this important and growing issue. It highlights the findings from past research and and evidence about what works, summarises the key characteristics of successful interventions, looks at how they relate to the prevention agenda, and the particular role health and social care professionals can play.

The adult social care outcomes framework 2014/15: handbook of definitions

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2014

This handbook sets out the indicators for measuring adult social care outcomes in 2014 and 2015 using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The framework is designed to support councils to improve the quality of care and support services they provide and give a national overview of adult social care outcomes. The handbook provides technical detail of each measure, with examples to minimise confusion and inconsistency in reporting and interpretation. The indicators are structured around the four key domains set out in the framework, including: enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs; delaying and reducing the need for care and support; ensuring people have a positive experience of care and support; and safeguarding people whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm.

Developing the power of strong, inclusive communities

MILLER Clive, WILTON Catherine
2014

Sets out a strategy, which can be adapted locally, for how health and wellbeing boards can fulfil new wellbeing and prevention duties under the Care Act. The framework supports the development of strong and inclusive communities and indicates how people, communities and services can more effectively and efficiently work together to co-produce outcomes. The framework incorporates key areas of action for the health and wellbeing boards, which include: keep people at the centre and focus on their outcomes; focus on both assets and needs; focus on all levels of prevention; rethink integration; target people with two or more long term conditions; work through universal service providers; enable community and cross-sector systems leadership; develop a new approach to health and wellbeing strategies; and adopt a collaborative approach to priority setting and savings. The framework has been trialled with a number of trailblazer health and wellbeing boards each of whom refined and adapted it to reflect local circumstances.

Going home alone: counting the cost to older people and the NHS

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

Assesses the impact of home from hospital services, which focus on supporting older people in their homes following a stay in hospital and seek to reduce the likelihood that they will need to be readmitted to hospital. The report brings together the findings of a literature review (as well as discussions with relevant experts), the results of the survey of 401 people aged 75 or over who had spent at least one night in hospital on one or more occasions within the past five years, and the outputs from a cost-impact analysis using national data and results from the survey. It sets out the policy context in England, Scotland and Wales, with its focus on preventive care, better integration of health and care services, and on shifting care away from the hospital into homes and communities. It then discusses the demand drivers for these schemes, including the ageing population, the growth in hospital readmissions, and decreasing length of stay. The report examines the experiences of older people after leaving hospital, looking at admissions, discharge, need for support following discharge, and type and duration of support. It suggests that home from hospital schemes can help to improve the well-being of their users and to reduce social isolation and loneliness and the number of hospital readmissions, as well as demand for other health and care services. The results of the cost-impact analysis suggest that, were home from hospital schemes appropriately targeted and effective in addressing ‘excess admissions’, they may produce a saving for the NHS of £40.4m per year.

Commissioning for better outcomes: a route map

UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM. Health Services Management Centre
2014

Sets out standards for high quality commissioning to support a dynamic process of continuous improvement and, through self-assessment and peer review, to challenge commissioners and their partners, to strengthen and innovate to achieve improved outcomes for adults using social care, their carers, families and communities. There are 12 standards grouped into four domains, including person-centred and outcome-focused commissioning, inclusiveness, effective leadership and promotion of sustainable and diverse market place. They have been developed from a review of the available literature, the engagement of a wide range of stakeholders, the input from a project steering group coordinated by Think Local Act Personal, and an expert review of a final draft of the standards by local authorities and other key organisations. The prototype document will be piloted by a small number of local authorities and will shape and inform a new offer within the Local Government Association peer challenge programme which will become available in April 2015.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Results 221 - 230 of 313

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