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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 251 - 260 of 313

'When I get off the phone I feel like I belong to the human race': evaluation of the Silver Line Helpline pilots

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE
2013

An evaluation of the Silver Line helpline and befriending service which was set up in response to loneliness and isolation of older people in the UK. The service has been piloted in the North West of the UK, and in the Isle of Man since the end of November 2012 and provides a helpline offering information, referrals to other organisations and someone to talk to 24 hours a day. The evaluation included a literature review, interviews by phone and in person, and fieldwork in the three call centres. The results found that the service was fulfilling its three key objectives of providing a referral service, delivering a befriending service to combat loneliness, and to help identify those who are vulnerable and may be suffering abuse or neglect. The evalution also highlights the skills and values that staff and volunteers considered to be essential when operating the service. Key recommendations for the future included extending the pilot across the country through partnership.

Telecare and older people's social relations: AKTIVE working paper 3

KOIVUNEN Emma-Reetta
2014

This paper focuses on the social relationships in the everyday lives of participants in the AKTIVE study and considers how telecare fits into these. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. This paper examines types of relationships and how these change, with a focus on being cared for and on the loneliness which many participants experienced. After discussing these aspects, the paper explores how telecare fitted into these relationships, assesses the extent to which social relations support or hinder telecare use, and discusses research participants’ experiences of this. The paper addresses three of the AKTIVE project’s research questions, adding to knowledge of: the characteristics of older people who use telecare and the contexts in which they do so; how telecare is used and affects those involved; and barriers to the adoption of telecare. In examining older people’s social relationships and how telecare fits into and affects these, the paper builds on sociological research on the use of technology, much of which has focused on information and communication technologies (ICTs). The paper explores new data collected through Everyday Life Analysis (ELA), a methodology using ethnographic observations and interviews with older people over a period of six to nine months. Research participants were supported to create maps of their social relations to help identify the people who supported them, who were also interviewed or observed wherever possible.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation among older people

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, CONTACT THE ELDERLY
2012

This At a glance briefing explains the importance of tackling social isolation and loneliness, particularly among older people. It highlights the adverse effects of feeling isolated and describes a number of services that have been found to help reduce the problem. It draws on research evidence from SCIE's 'Research briefing 39: preventing loneliness and isolation: interventions and outcomes'. It also includes case study examples of two services - a befriending scheme and social group - that help to help mitigate loneliness and isolation and improve the wellbeing of older people.

Outcomes of the active at 60 community agent programme: research report

HATAMIAN Areenay, PEARMAIN Daniel, GOLDEN Sarah
2012

The Active at 60 Community Agents programme was a Department for Work and Pensions fund to encourage community groups and their volunteers to help people approaching and post retirement (particularly those at risk of social isolation and loneliness in later life) to stay or become active and positively engaged with society. It was launched in March 2011 and ran until December 2011. This evaluation of the programme included surveys and interviews with local funders, group leaders, community agents (volunteers whose role aimed to empower and support older people to become and/or stay active) and older people. The report describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the findings, covering the role of Community Agents, reaching and engaging older people, what groups did with the funding, what difference the programme made to older people who took part and wider benefits, the legacy of the programme, and the role of local funders and programme management. It also discusses how far the programme achieved its aims and sets out key lessons learned.

Loneliness and isolation: evidence review

AGE UK
2012

Loneliness and isolation are not the same. The causes of loneliness are not just physical isolation and lack of companionship, but also sometimes the lack of a useful role in society. Estimates of prevalence of loneliness tend to concentrate on the older population and they vary widely, with reputable research coming up with figures of 6%-13% of the UK population being described as often or always lonely. This evidence review has been produced in order to provide evidence to underpin decision-making for people involved in commissioning, service development, fundraising and influencing. It discusses: the policy context; what is known about loneliness and isolation in older people; and what has been done (including one-to-one services, group services, and community involvement) and how effective they were. The key messages from the evidence are listed.

Evidence review: loneliness in later life

DAVIDSON Susan, ROSSALL Phil
2014

A summary of available evidence from research on loneliness in the community in later life. Loneliness can be understood as an individual’s personal, subjective sense of lacking desired affection, closeness, and social interaction with others. Over 1 million older people say they are always or often feel lonely and nearly half of them say that television or pets are their main form of company. The report reviews the literature on measuring and quantifying loneliness and on factors associated with loneliness in later life, including age, ethnicity and language, sex, living arrangements and marital status, geography, housing, health, income, informal care and sexual orientation. The review considers the evidence on the impact of loneliness on older people and the most common social interaction interventions for older people. These include: specialised groups targeting older people, community engagement, befriending, gatekeeping, and the internet. The review includes an appendix on social support and its sources.

Supporting commissioners of assisted living services: stage 1: research report

CONSILIUM
2014

This report presents the findings of research to examine the skills and knowledge that are unique to those commissioning assisted living technologies (ALT). These technologies include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. They are referred to collectively as assistive living services (ALS). The research methodology included desk based review of the evidence and consultation with a range of local authority commissioners in England. The report presents a summary of different commissioning models used, provides examples of good practice and what is working well, areas that need improvement and challenges facing commissioners. It also discusses workforce development issues and measuring impact.

Combatting loneliness: a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2012

Loneliness is a significant and growing issue for many older people.  Research over decades has found that acute loneliness has been consistently estimated to affect around 10-13% of the population of older people. Over the same time period, there has been a growing percentage of older people who sometimes feel lonely. Loneliness makes older people vulnerable to developing chronic health problems, depression and increases the need for social care services or residential care. This guide offers a brief summary of key research on the issue of loneliness, and some practical steps every local authority, working in partnership with other statutory bodies and their partners, can take to tackle loneliness, setting them in the context of an overall framework for action. The described framework comprises 3 tiers of actions: at the strategic level across the local authority; at the level of the community; and at the level of the individual. Suggested practical steps are illustrated by case studies drawn from around the country.

Can online innovations enhance social care? Exploring the challenges of using digital technology to develop new models of support for older people

AYRES Shirley
2013

Explores how the care sector can take advantage of the power and potential of digital technology and social networks to develop new models of support for older people. The effective use of digital technologies – based around the internet, computers, mobile phones, social networks, telecare and telehealth – are critical in enabling people to live more independent and fulfilling lives, irrespective of their health and care needs. This is especially true as the demand for care services increases. The paper, using a range of good practice examples, highlights the role of digital technology in alleviating social isolation, enabling access to information and knowledge and in supporting the lives and work of many carers around the UK. The paper calls for a better shared understanding of innovations in this sector, a more co-ordinated and coherent approach to enable carers and care seekers to easily access online information and support, greater shared learning, collaboration and partnerships, and the promotion of events that showcase digital technology innovations in care which could be adopted by local authorities, the NHS and housing providers, as well as being purchased by people funding their own support needs.

Can a neighbourhood approach to loneliness contribute to people's well-being?: report

COLLINS Angela B., WRIGLEY Julie
2014

This report evaluates the overall impact of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme. The main principles of the Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme are that community activities can contribute to the well-being of people at risk of, or experiencing, loneliness; that such people can play a central role in these activities; and that this involvement can also enhance community well-being. This report is based on consultation with community researchers, professional stakeholders, programme staff and community members. The report highlights that good practice requires skilled staff who are able to communicate effectively and provide pastoral support to volunteers; reveals changes in community researchers resulting from their involvement in the programme; demonstrates where there has been community impact; and shares wider lessons which can be learnt from taking a neighbourhood approach.

Results 251 - 260 of 313

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