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Results for 'care providers'

Results 1 - 8 of 8

The homecare deficit 2016: a report on the funding of older people’s homecare across the United Kingdom

UNITED KINGDOM HOMECARE ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on data obtained from freedom of information requests, this report analyses average prices paid by councils for home care services across all four administrations of the United Kingdom. It also provides a breakdown by England’s nine government regions. The data were obtained during a sample week in April 2016 following the introduction of the new National Living Wage. The analysis found that only one in ten authorities paid an average price at or above UKHCA’s minimum price of £16.70 per hour. It also found that seven authorities paid average prices which the UKHCA believe are unlikely even to cover care workers’ wages and on-costs of £11.94 per hour. Only 24 councils had completed calculations for the costs of home care. The report highlights the low rates that many councils are paying independent and voluntary homecare providers. It argues that this underfunding is a root cause of the instability of local homecare markets and the low pay and conditions of the homecare workforce. The analysis also exposes the level of risk that councils place on a system intended to support older and disabled people. The report makes a number of recommendations, which include the need for local authorities to provide calculations of their costs of homecare.

A shared life is a healthy life: how the Shared Lives model of care can improve health outcomes and support the NHS

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2015

Explains how Shared Lives schemes support people with health needs, making use of community based solutions which can be more cost effective than traditional institutional care. In Shared Lives, an adult (and sometimes a 16/17 year old) who needs support and/or accommodation moves in with or regularly visits an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. Together they share family and community life. Half of the 12,000 UK citizens using Shared Lives are living with their carer as part of a supportive household; half visit their carer for day support or overnight breaks. Shared Lives is also used as a stepping stone for an individual to possibly become fully independent. The report demonstrates that this approach can provide care at lower cost; improves people’s health; reduces pressure on health services; and reduces inequalities in health service provision.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: project report

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Summarises the methods and approach, discusses the learning and shares knowledge arising from the ‘Assessing social care market and provider sustainability’ project, which has developed guidance and a toolkit for the Department of Health, the Local Government Association, and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. These resources are designed to support implementation of the Care Act 2014 and help local authorities fulfil their responsibilities in the event of a care provider failure.

Nottinghamshire Micro-enterprise Project

Nottinghamshire County Council

Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC), in partnership with Community Catalysts CIC, have invested in and supported the growth of local micro-enterprises offering a broad range of care and support options. The aim was to ensure that local people have a high level of choice and diversity and are more likely to find support that is responsive to their personal needs. Micro-enterprises deliver care or support services with no more than five paid or unpaid full-time equivalent workers and are independent of any parent organisation.

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Micro-enterprises: small enough to care?

NEEDHAM Catherine, et al
2015

Outlines the findings of an evaluation of micro-enterprises in social care in England, which ran from 2013 to 2015. The report focuses on very small organisations, here defined as having five members of staff or fewer, which provide care and support to adults with an assessed social care need. The research design encompassed a local asset-based approach, working with co-researchers with experience of care in the three localities. Twenty seven organisations took part in the study overall, including 17 micro-providers, whose performance was compared to that of 4 small, 4 medium and 2 large providers. A total of 143 people were interviewed for the project. The study found that: micro-providers offer more personalised support than larger providers, particularly for home-based care; they deliver more valued outcomes than larger providers, in relation to helping people do more of the things they value and enjoy; they are better than larger providers at some kinds of innovation, being more flexible and able to provide support to marginalised communities; and they offer better value for money than larger providers. Factors that help micro-providers to emerge and become sustainable include: dedicated support for start-up and development, strong personal networks within a localities, and balancing good partnerships (including with local authorities) with maintaining an independent status. Inhibiting factors, on the other hand, include a reliance on self-funders and the financial fragility of the organisation. The report makes the following recommendations: commissioners should develop different approaches to enable micro-enterprises to join preferred provider lists; social care teams should promote flexible payment options for people wanting to use micro-enterprises, including direct payments; social workers and other care professionals need to be informed about micro-enterprises operating close-by so that they can refer people to them; regulators need to ensure that their processes are proportional and accessible for very small organisations; and micro-enterprises need access to dedicated start-up support, with care sector expertise, as well as ongoing support and peer networks.

Results 1 - 8 of 8

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