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Results for 'clinical commissioning groups'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

A call to action: commissioning for prevention

NHS ENGLAND
2013

This document sets out a framework intended to help clinical commissioning groups think about how to commission for effective prevention. Commissioning for prevention is one potentially transformative change that CCGs can make, together with Health and Wellbeing Boards and their other local partners. The paper argues that whether on grounds of health need, cost or public expectations the case for developing a wellness rather than solely an illness service is compelling. This can be achieved by effectively commissioning for prevention through the following steps: analysing the most important health problems at population level; working together with partners and the community, setting common goals or priorities; identifying high-impact prevention programmes focused on the top causes of premature mortality and chronic disability; planning the resource profile needed to deliver prevention goals; and measuring impact and experimenting rapidly.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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