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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'commissioning'

Results 21 - 30 of 33

Impact assessment toolkit: commissioning assistive technologies

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

This online tool outlines the key steps of planning and implementing the impact assessment of assisted living technologies (ALT) and assistive living services (ALT). It includes practical tips, links to other sources of guidance and areas to discuss with partners. The toolkit covers designing an evaluation framework; assigning impact measures; establishing a sample of people to assess impact; establishing unit costs; developing data capture research tools; measuring return on investment; quality control; and using the findings to inform future delivery. The tool should be used in conjunction with two accompanying reports: 'Supporting commissioners of assisted living Services: stage 1: research report' and 'Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance'.

Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

The practice guidance has been produced to support people who have the responsibility for commissioning assisted living technology (ALT) and assisted living services (ALS). These services include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. The guide looks at general principles, such as establishing a vision and defining the strategy; carrying out a local needs assessment; service specification and procurement; and developing systems to measure performance and impact. Although primarily developed for commissioners based in social care settings, it may also be useful for those working across housing or health services. An accompanying research report and toolkit have also been produced.

Guidance for commissioning public mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. Public mental health involves: an assessment of the risk factors for mental disorder, the protective factors for wellbeing, and the levels of mental disorder and wellbeing in the local population; the delivery of appropriate interventions to promote wellbeing, prevent mental disorder, and treat mental disorder early; and ensuring that people at ‘higher risk’ of mental disorder and poor wellbeing are proportionately prioritised in assessment and intervention delivery. This guide is about the commissioning of public mental health interventions to reduce the burden of mental disorder, enhance mental wellbeing, and support the delivery of a broad range of outcomes relating to health, education and employment. It is the second version of the public mental health guide: It has been revised and updated to include new sources of data and information.

Guidance for commissioners of mental health services for people from black and minority ethnic communities

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2014

This guide describes what ‘good’ mental health services for people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities look like. While all of the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health commissioning guides apply to all communities, there are good reasons why additional guidance is required on commissioning mental health services for people from BME communities. The document sets out the key priorities that should guide the commissioning of mental health services for BME groups. These include: supporting equitable access to effective interventions, and equitable experiences and outcomes; identifying and implementing specific measures to reduce ethnic inequalities in mental health; developing local strategies and plans for improving mental health and wellbeing amongst BME communities; making targeted investments in public mental health interventions for BME communities; involving service users, carers as well as members of local BME communities in the commissioning process; collecting, analysing, reporting, and acting upon data about ethnicity, service use, and outcomes; creating more accessible, broader, and flexible care pathways, and integrating services across the voluntary, community, social care and health sectors; ensuring every mental health service are culturally capable and able to address the diverse needs of a multi-cultural population through effective and appropriate forms of assessment and interventions; developing a number of strategies to reduce coercive care, which is experienced disproportionately by some BME groups. This guide focuses on services for working age adults. However, it could also be interpreted for commissioning specialist mental health services, such as CAMHS, secure psychiatric care, and services for older adults. It includes case-examples derived from an online survey of various BME stakeholder groups on the issue of quality in BME service provision

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Supporting commissioners of assisted living services: stage 1: research report

CONSILIUM
2014

This report presents the findings of research to examine the skills and knowledge that are unique to those commissioning assisted living technologies (ALT). These technologies include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. They are referred to collectively as assistive living services (ALS). The research methodology included desk based review of the evidence and consultation with a range of local authority commissioners in England. The report presents a summary of different commissioning models used, provides examples of good practice and what is working well, areas that need improvement and challenges facing commissioners. It also discusses workforce development issues and measuring impact.

Guidance for commissioners of community specialist mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. This guide is about the commissioning of specialist community mental health services. It explores the role of Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), Assertive Outreach Teams and Early Intervention Teams among others. It has been written by a group of specialist community mental health care experts in consultation with patients and carers. Much is evidence-based, but ideas that are felt to be best practice by expert consensus are included.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

Results 21 - 30 of 33

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