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Results for 'community groups'

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT
2016

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren
2016

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND, NHS ENGLAND
2016

This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This practice guideline covers approaches to involving local communities as a way of promoting health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities. Recommendations cover: developing collaboration and partnership approaches encourage alliances between community members and statutory, community and voluntary organisations to meet local needs and priorities; involving people in peer and lay roles to represent local needs and priorities; local approaches to making community engagement an integral part of health and wellbeing initiatives; and making it as easy as possible for people to get involved. The guideline also makes recommendations for future research which include research on effectiveness and cost effectiveness; frameworks to evaluate the impact of community engagement; aspects of collaborations and partnerships that lead to improved health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of social media for improving health and wellbeing. The guideline updates and replaces NICE guideline PH9 (published February 2008).

Friends on tap: the role of pubs at the heart of the community

DUNBAR Robin
2016

This report summarises a series of studies carried out on behalf of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) on the role that community pubs play in people’s health, happiness and social cohesion. To set the scene, the paper first provides a brief overview of how people create their friendships. It then raises the problem of large scale social cohesion and provides some insights into how social cohesion has been engineered in the past. Finally, it presents the findings from a national poll of pub use and two studies of behaviour in pubs undertaken to assess the social value of small community pubs compared to large city centre pubs. The evidence suggests that while 40 per cent of people in the UK now typically socialise with friends in someone’s home, a third of the population prefer to do so in pubs, and regard pubs as a safe place to meet friends. People who said they have a ‘local’ or those who patronise small community pubs appear to have more close friends on whom they can depend for support, are more satisfied with their lives and feel more embedded in their local communities than those who said they do not have a local pub. The paper makes a number of recommendations for publicans, city planners and policy makers to ensure pubs play a role in people’s health, wellbeing and community cohesion.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
2014

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities.

Proactive Primary Care

NHS Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group

Lewisham CCG carried out a Proactive Primary Care (PPC) project in 2014, aiming to provide better support to people with long-term conditions (LTCs). A test group of people were called three times over three months by trained "telephoners" using motivational techniques. Calls explored with individuals their current health, their confidence in managing potential deterioration in their condition and health issues they wanted to address. Callers supported people by suggesting ways to tackle any issues and by putting them in touch with local third sector or statutory agencies.

Results 1 - 10 of 12

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