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Results for 'cost effectiveness'

Results 1 - 10 of 29

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference

SOCIAL PRESCRIBING NETWORK
2016

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference, which sets out a definition of social prescribing, outlines principles for effective service provision and the steps needed to evaluate and measure the impact of social prescribing. It also includes an analysis of a pre-conference survey, completed by 78 participants to explore their experience of social prescribing. Key ingredients identified that underpin social prescribing included: funding, healthcare professional buy-in, simple referral process, link workers with appropriate training, patient centred care, provision of services, patient buy-in and benefits of social prescribing. The benefits of social prescribing fell into six broad headings: physical and emotional health and wellbeing; behaviour change; cost effectiveness and sustainability; capacity to build up the voluntary community; local resilience and cohesion; and tackling the social determinants of ill health. Afternoon sessions covered the following topics: obtaining economic data on social prescribing; engaging different stakeholders in social prescribing; standards and regulations that could be applied to social prescribing services; qualities and skills necessary to commission high quality social prescribing services; designing research studies on social prescribing. Short case studies are included. There was consensus from participants that social prescribing provides potential to reduce pressures on health and care services through referral to non-medical, and often community-based, sources of support.

A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications

POLLEY M., et al
2017

This paper critically appraises the current evidence as to whether social prescribing reduces the demand for health services and is cost effective. It draws on the results of a systematic review of online databases which identified 94 reports, 14 of which met the selection criteria. They included studies on the effect of social prescribing on demand for general practice, the effect on attendance at accident and emergency (A&E) and value for money and social return on investment assessments. The evidence broadly supports the potential for social prescribing to reduce demand on primary and secondary care, however, the quality of the evidence is weak. It also identifies encouraging evidence that social prescribing delivers cost savings to the health service, but this is not proven or fully quantified. In conclusion, the paper looks at the possible reasons for the growth in scale and scope of social prescribing across the UK and makes recommendations for more evaluations of on-going projects to assess the effectiveness of social prescribing.

Living, not existing: putting prevention at the heart of care for older people in Wales

ROYAL COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
2017

This report focuses on the important contribution that occupational therapists can make to support further integration of health and social care in Wales. It looks at the role of occupational therapy in helping older people to remain independent and live in their own communities for as long as possible, preventing or delaying the need for expensive care long-term. The report focuses on three key areas: prevention or delaying the need for care and support; helping older people to remain in their communities; and ensuring equality of access to occupational therapy. It provides recommendations to improve the design and delivery of services and examples of best practice and individual case studies to how occupational therapists can contribution to integrated, person-centred services. These include for occupational therapists to work more closely with general practitioners, take on leadership roles to provide expertise to community providers on the development of person and community centred services; and the development of formal partnership agreements across local housing, health and social care sectors to ensure all older people have access to occupational therapy services.

Social prescribing and health and well-being

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2017

This briefing paper sets out the important role that social prescribing has on the health and well-being of the population in Wales and highlights some of the social prescribing initiatives already in place which show how patients are benefiting from integrated, person-centred and non-medical services. The initiatives include the Valleys Steps programme which considers alternatives for seeking medical treatment for ongoing mental health issues; Gofal Community Food Co-ops, which provide opportunities for mental health patients to interact with members of the local community; and Care and Repair Cymru’s Warm Homes Prescription Scheme. It also highlights existing evidence which shows the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social prescribing.

Dance to Health: evaluation of the pilot programme

AESOP
2017

Outlines the results of Aesop's falls prevention dance programme for older people, Dance to Health. This arts based intervention address older people's falls and problems with some current falls prevention exercise programmes, by incorporating evidence-based exercise programmes into creative, social and engaging dance activity. The programme was developed using the Aesop 7-item checklist, which lists the features an arts programme should have for it to be taken up by the health system and made available to every patient who could benefit. The report outlines the rationale for creating the programme, the outcomes achieved - in addition to reduced falls, cost effectiveness, and the wider impact of the programme. It reports that the pilot successfully brought people from the worlds of dance and older people's exercise together, was able to train dance artists in the evidence-based falls programme, and also developed six evidence-based falls prevention programmes with 196 participants. A total of 73 per cent of participants achieved the target of 50 hours’ attendance over the six months, compared with a national average for completing standard falls prevention exercise programmes of 31 per cent for primary prevention and 46 per cent for secondary prevention. Additional outcomes identified included increases in group identification, relationships and reduced loneliness, functional health and wellbeing, and mental health and wellbeing.

Local community initiatives in Western Bay: formative evaluation summary report

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
2016

An evaluation of the early implementation of Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Local Community Coordination (LCC) in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea, covering recruitment and initial delivery activities between July 2015 and April 2016. The initiative used both LAC and LCC coordinators to help communities to develop local relationships and support, reduce dependence on services and create conditions for long-term resilience. The evaluation identifies positive outcomes for people, communities and local finances; highlights factors which help create the conditions for good outcomes; and provides recommendations for the development and improvement of LAC. The report also contains case study examples to show how the initiative was able to help individuals. The results of the evaluation found good progress in both LAC and LCC areas, including community engagement, identifying community assets and individuals for support. It also found LAC helped development of strong and sustained personal networks for individuals and communities, reducing isolation and helping to build local resilience. The LAC implementation in Swansea demonstrated cost benefits of £800k - £1.2m, with expected benefits to rise when LAC is embedded more fully within communities. Findings and recommendations are listed across a number of key themes, including: strategy, funding, shared learning, leadership, information recording, recruitment and roles, cost benefits.

Health and digital: reducing inequalities, improving society. An evaluation of the Widening Digital Participation programme

TINDER FOUNDATION
2016

Evaluation of the Tinder Foundation and NHS England Widening Digital Participation programme, which set out to improve the digital health skills of people in hard-to-reach communities in order to help them take charge of their own heath. It aimed to ensure that health inequalities resulting from digital exclusion do not become more pronounced. The programme involved: building a Digital Health Information network of local providers who provided face-to-face support to help people improve their skills; developing digital health information; supporting people to access health information online and learn how to complete digital medical transactions; and funding Innovation Pathfinder organisations to test innovative approaches to help people improve their digital health skills. This report evaluates the key figures and learning from the final year of the project and also provides a summary of the key findings across the three-year programme. It discusses the scale and impact of behaviour change on frontline services; priority audiences participating, including people with dementia and people with learning disabilities; and new models of care. The evaluation found that during the duration of the project 221,941 people were trained to use digital health resources. This has resulted in more people using the internet as their first port of call for information, and potential savings from reduced GP and A&E visits. The report estimates that the combined annual cost savings of reduced visits to GPs and A&E comes to approximately £6 millon against an NHS investment of £810,000 in year three.

The economic value of Dorset POPP services. A focus on two significant issues: malnutrition and fire safety

HARFLETT Naomi, et al
2016

An economic analysis of three schemes from Dorset Partnership for Older People Projects (POPP), focusing on their value and effectiveness in preventing malnutrition and preventing fire related injuries. Dorset POPP schemes use a community led preventative approach and aim to improve the quality of life of older people and to save money by preventing ineffective use of publicly funded services. The report uses published figures of the costs of malnutrition and the economic value of preventing fire injuries and applies the figure to contact monitoring and costs data from three of the Dorset POPP projects to provide an estimate of the potential economic value. The schemes are: the Wayfinder Programme, which provides signposting and support on services such as welfare benefits and pensions, retaining independent living, social activities, telecare and lunch clubs; the Community Initiatives Commissioning Fund (CICF), which funds initiatives identified by local people such as lunch clubs, social clubs, and neighbourcare schemes; and Safe And Independent Living (SAIL) multi-agency referral scheme, which provides a multi-agency referral approach to enabling access to signposting, support, and services. For all of the interventions included in the analysis, just a very small proportion (often less than one per cent) of the contacts or referrals made would be needed to prevent malnutrition or fire related injuries, in order to save money.

What role can local and national supportive services play in supporting independent and healthy living in individuals 65 and over?

WINDLE Karen
2015

This report explores the evidence base around effective and cost-effective preventative services and the role that they can play in supporting older people’s independence, health and wellbeing. It looks at the available evidence to support the benefits of preventative services in mitigating social inclusion and loneliness and improving physical health. It also highlights evidence on the effectiveness of information, advice and signposting in helping people access preventative services and the benefits of providing practical interventions such as minor housing repairs. It considers a wide range of primary and secondary preventative services, including: health screening, vaccinations, day services, reablement, and care coordination and management. It then outlines two teritary prevention services which aim to prevent imminent admission to acute health settings. These are community based rapid response services and ambulatory emergency care units, which operation within the secondary care environment. The report then highlights gaps in the evidence base and and looks at what is needed to develop preventative services to achieve health and independent ageing by 2013. It looks at the changes needed in service funding and commissioning, the balance between individual responsibility and organisational support, and how preventative services should be implemented.

Evidence to inform the commissioning of social prescribing

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
2015

Summarises the findings of a rapid appraisal of available evidence on the effectiveness of social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community, and can be used to improve health and wellbeing. For the review searches were conducted on the databases: DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and NHS EED for relevant systematic reviews and economic evaluations. Additional searches were also carried out on MEDLINE, ASSIA, Social Policy and Practice, NICE, SCIE and NHS. Very little good quality evidence was identified. Most available evidence described evaluations of pilot projects but failed to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. The briefing calls for better evaluation of new schemes. It recommends that evaluation should be of a comparative design; examine for whom and how well a scheme works; the effect it has and its costs.

Results 1 - 10 of 29

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