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Results for 'emergency health services'

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Harnessing social action to support older people: evaluating the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund

GEORGHIOU Theo, et al
2016

Presents the findings of an evaluation of seven social action projects funded by the Cabinet Office, NHS England, Monitor, NHS Trust Development Authority and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. The aim of the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund was to scale up and test projects that used volunteers to support older people to stay well, manage health conditions or recover after illness, and thereby reduce pressure on hospitals. The organisations supported by the fund comprised a range of national and local charities. These projects fell into three broad categories: community-based support, supporting discharge from hospital wards, and supporting individuals in A&E department to avoid admissions. Between them, the projects offered a wide range of services to older people – both direct (for example help with shopping or providing transport) and indirect (linking with other services). The evaluation resulted in a mixed set of findings. From the interviews with staff, volunteers and local stakeholders, there was evidence of services that had made an impact by providing practical help, reassurance and connection with other services that could reduce isolation and enable independence. Those involved with the projects felt that volunteers and project staff could offer more time to users than pressurised statutory sector staff, which enabled a fuller understanding of a person’s needs while also freeing up staff time. However, the analysis of hospital activity data in the months that followed people's referral into the projects did not suggest that these schemes impacted on the use of NHS services in the way that was assumed, with no evidence of a reduction in emergency hospital admissions, or in costs of hospital care following referral to the social action projects. The one exception was the project based in an A&E department, which revealed a smaller number of admissions in the short term. The report questions whether these sorts of interventions can ever be fully captured solely using hospital-based data and conceptualising reduced or shortened admissions as a key marker of success.

Growing old together: sharing new ways to support older people

COMMISSION ON IMPROVING URGENT CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE
2016

Final report from the Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People which provides guidance for those involved in designing care for older people and outlines eight key principles the health and care sector can adopt to improve urgent care for older people. The Commission was established out of a concern that the care system was not meeting the needs of older people, resulting in lower quality of care, a lack of out-of-hospital services as an alternative to A&E, not enough focus on prevention and early intervention, and delayed transfers of care. It brought together a range of experts, received over 60 evidence submissions; carried out visits to sites using innovative ways to deliver care; consulted with NHS Confederation members and patient and carer groups; and commissioned an evidence review. The report draws on the evidence to look at the case for change. It then outlines eight key principles that can be used when redesigning health and social care system: start with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals; a greater focus on proactive care; acknowledge current strains on the system and allow time to think; the importance of care co-ordination and navigation; greater use of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams; ensure workforce, training and core skills reflect modern day requirements; leadership should encourage us to do things differently; and metrics must truly reflect the care experience for older people. Short case studies of innovative practice are included in the report, covering acute and primary care, voluntary sector and local government partners and commissioners.

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