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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 1 - 10 of 30

Local community initiatives in Western Bay: formative evaluation summary report

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
2016

An evaluation of the early implementation of Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Local Community Coordination (LCC) in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea, covering recruitment and initial delivery activities between July 2015 and April 2016. The initiative used both LAC and LCC coordinators to help communities to develop local relationships and support, reduce dependence on services and create conditions for long-term resilience. The evaluation identifies positive outcomes for people, communities and local finances; highlights factors which help create the conditions for good outcomes; and provides recommendations for the development and improvement of LAC. The report also contains case study examples to show how the initiative was able to help individuals. The results of the evaluation found good progress in both LAC and LCC areas, including community engagement, identifying community assets and individuals for support. It also found LAC helped development of strong and sustained personal networks for individuals and communities, reducing isolation and helping to build local resilience. The LAC implementation in Swansea demonstrated cost benefits of £800k - £1.2m, with expected benefits to rise when LAC is embedded more fully within communities. Findings and recommendations are listed across a number of key themes, including: strategy, funding, shared learning, leadership, information recording, recruitment and roles, cost benefits.

Evaluation of the Shared Lives Mental Health Project

HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin
2017

An evaluation of a project to support the development of Shared Lives as an option for people with mental ill health. The project has supported seven local Shared Lives schemes to develop, demonstrate and market a financially viable and commission ready approach to Shared Lives mental health support, and to generate learning about what works. Drawing on data collected through a mixed methods evaluation approach, this report describes the impact and learning from the project. The evaluation has found evidence of the positive impact that having support through a Shared Lives arrangement – whether it is day support, short breaks or long-term arrangements – can have on the lives of people with mental ill health. There are examples of improvements in general wellbeing and increased participation in community life, as well as specific examples where people’s mental health has stabilised and hospital stays have been prevented. The impact goes beyond those in Shared Lives arrangements to family members of those being supported, Shared Lives carers and their families and communities that people are supported in. Although some of the seven project schemes experienced challenges and frustrations and in some cases growth was slow, all saw increases in the number of new arrangements for people with mental ill health and all saw increases in the number of Shared Lives carers offering mental health support.

Evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service: final report

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An independent evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service, which is delivered in partnership by Crossroads Care Rotherham, Rotherham and Doncaster Alzheimer's Society and Age UK Rotherham on behalf of NHS Rotherham Clinical Commissioning Group. The service provides information, advice and practical support to help carers of people living with dementia to care for the person with dementia at home for as long as possible. The evaluation looked at the impact of the service on carer health and well-being, the effect on patient and carer use of NHS care and resources, and views on the effectiveness of the service. It included interviews with stakeholders including five service staff, one GP, and one representative of the CCG; and questionnaires and interviews with carers using the service; and three in-depth client case studies. The evaluation reports that the service reached more than 330 carers during its first year, from February 2015 to March 2016. Successes of the service included linking carers in to other services from the statutory, voluntary and community sector; providing carers information about benefits entitlements; and access to home based support services. The service was highly valued by beneficiaries and there was evidence for improvement in key outcome measures. These included small numbers of carers reporting better general well-being, better health and improvements in their carer quality of life. There was insufficient evidence to confirm whether the service had reduced the demand for emergency care.

Peer support in accommodation based support services: a social return on investment

NEWTON Angela, WOMER Jessica, WHATMOUGH Suzy
2017

This evaluation assessed the peer support delivered across three accommodation services in Hampshire to understand the ways in which it impacted people’s lives and what they valued most about it. The services provided support for people experiencing mental distress, many of who had multiple complex needs. A total of 12 volunteers delivered peer support both on-to-one support and group peer support. A total of 22 people completed questionnaires for the evaluation, which included 12 services users (71 per cent of all service users who had used peer support), and 10 Peer Supporters (83 per cent of all Peer Supporters). Costs of providing peer support and the number of hours of direct support provided by peer supporters were also collected. From this, the return on investment in peer support was calculated using a methodology for measuring the equivalent worth of activity in social terms. The results found that the majority of peer supporters and service users who took part in the study had improved levels of confidence, felt more able to manage their mental health; had an improved social life and support network; felt more accepted; and felt more hopeful about the future. It also calculated that every pound spent on peer support provided a social return worth £4.94. The findings demonstrate that peer support is valued by those involved and helps support people to achieve their outcomes and lead more independent and fulfilling lives. The results of the study will also help communicate the value of peer support in financial terms to with commissioners and funders.

Reducing delayed transfer of care through housing interventions: evidence of impact. Case study

ADAMS Sue
2016

A case study and independent evaluation of a housing intervention designed to help older patients to return home from hospital more rapidly and safety. The initiative is delivered by West of England Care & Repair (WE C&R), who organise clutter clearance/deep cleaning; urgent home repairs, emergency heating repairs and essential housing adaptations for older people in hospital. The evaluation examined all case records, interviewed 15 hospital staff and undertook an in depth analysis of a sample of 4 cases. Analysis of the case records estimated a saving in hospital bed days of £13,526. The cost of housing interventions was £948, resulting in a cost benefit ratio of 14:1. Additional savings in hospital staff time amounted to a further £897. A short case study illustrates how the service was able to help one woman return home from hospital. It concludes that the small scale evaluation is indicative of the potential savings that a practical and effective home from hospital housing intervention service can generate for the health service.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

Testing promising approaches to reducing loneliness: results and learnings of Age UK's loneliness Pilot

AGE UK
2016

This report shares the results of Age UK’s loneliness pilot programme, which aimed to find out Age UK services could better reach older people experiencing loneliness, develop individually tailored solutions and help older people access activities and services within their community. Chapter one outlines origins of the programme, which involved eight local Age UKs in a 12 month pilot. Local services developed three common approaches: recruiting ‘eyes on the ground’ to identify older people experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness; developing co-operative networks with other agencies; and use of traditional befriending services. Chapter two highlights examples of services that local Age UKs are delivering and how the adoption of certain approaches improved their impact on lonely older people. Chapter three look at some of the impacts of the programme. It found that a large number of the older people supported during the programme experienced a reduction in their loneliness scores. This was especially true amongst older people who were often lonely. Some older people also identified feelings of increased independence, wellbeing and connectedness with people. Chapter four outlines the next steps for the Age UK programme.

An exploration of the evidence system of UK mental health charities

BUCKLAND Leonora, FIENNES Caroline
2016

To investigate what may need to happen to help mental health charities make more evidence-informed decisions, this report examines how UK charities delivering mental health services currently produce, synthesise, disseminate and use evidence within their organisation. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 12 mental health service delivery charities of varying sizes and qualitative interviews with four mental health sector experts were carried out. The project used an inclusive definition of evidence comprising: evaluation evidence, user feedback; practitioner evidence and contextual evidence (e.g., research into the prevalence or type of need). In relation to the production of evidence, the report found that mental health charities have focused primarily on producing practitioner and stakeholder evidence. Although larger charities are beginning to carry out more evaluation research, lack of resources remain a problem. It also identified little evidence produced by the charities interviewed being routinely synthesised or included in systematic reviews; weak dissemination channels; and little use of third-party evidence when making decisions. Although the number of charities interviewed was small, the report identifies some important gaps including: the need for more rigorous evaluation research about the effectiveness of charities’ interventions; the potential to make more use of existing the academic literature; and, for more evidence to be actively disseminated within the sector to enable greater learning. Recommendations to improve evidence systems are also included.

Wigan community link worker service evaluation

INNOVATION UNIT
2016

Evaluation of the Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service, which was set up as a pilot in 2015 to improve the health and wellbeing of local people by helping them to access community based support and activities. It also helps those referred to use their skills and experience through volunteering. The evaluation, commissioned by Wigan Borough CCG and Wigan Council, aims to gain a better understanding of how the service is working, who is using it and what difference it is making to clients and referring services. The evaluation draws on an analysis of referral data, case studies and qualitative interviews with commissioners, people running services, patients, community link workers and representatives of voluntary and community organisations. Findings report high levels of commitment to the service from stakeholders, with health and care professionals valuing the service and promoting it to colleagues and clients. A total of 784 clients were supported between January 2015 and March 2016. Over half of these clients were over 55, with social isolation and mental health issues the most recurrent presenting issues, along with benefits and financial advice. The service is also used by number of carers. Client stories suggest that CLWs help them to feel supported and able to contribute in their community. The evaluation also found anecdotal evidence of reduced pressure on mainstream services. Recommendations include that the service retains it wide referral and low threshold for access; development of the skills of CLWs as relational workers through peer support and reflective practice; and enlists CLWs, clients and health professionals in co-designing and co-producing the service in the future.

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren
2016

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

Results 1 - 10 of 30

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News

Place-based care and support

SCIE's Ewan King blogs for the MJ local government magazine

Government policy framework published

Integration and BCF policy framework 2017-19
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Greater Manchester adult social care reform

SCIE and KPMG supporting development of business cases, plus SCIE work on asset-based approaches

Integrated Personal Commissioning evaluation

SCIE is part of a consortium evaluating IPC in 18 areas. SCIE's role is to facilitate co-production.

Delivering integrated care

NHS England has commissioned SCIE and PPL to support a series of events and webinars
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Care Act – Info & Advice

CPD-accredited course on providing info & advice under Care Act
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