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Results for 'housing'

Results 11 - 20 of 22

Quick guide: better use of care at home

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide provides case studies, ideas and practical tips to commissioners, health professionals and care providers on how to improve the relationships, processes and use of homecare and housing support to help people home from hospital. Care at home and housing support enables people to live independently and well in their preferred environment for longer, providing continuity and familiarity through frequent close contact. It plays an essential role in helping people return home, which should always be seen as the default option. The guide identifies common problems experienced and highlights good solutions which are already being implemented, that can be instigated quickly and effectively, focusing on three elements of a patient’s pathway: 1) planning for discharge home on arrival at hospital; 2) enabling people to go home with appropriate support; 3) and helping people to stay at home.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

The role of housing in adult safeguarding

CASS Elaine
2015

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of housing in adult safeguarding under the Care Act (2014) in England. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a summary of the implications for housing organisations and their staff of adult safeguarding under the Care Act. The implications, underpinned by the six safeguarding principles, are explained within a summary of the legal and practice framework for safeguarding in England. Findings: The paper draws upon research by Imogen Parry (2014). It argues that past failings in adult safeguarding in England have placed it high on the housing agenda and that housing has a key role to play in adult safeguarding. Practical implications: Housing organisations need to be proactive partners in local multi-agency arrangements for adult safeguarding. Staff and contractors need to receive training in line with their role to raise awareness of their safeguarding responsibilities. Originality/value: The value of the paper is to increase and maintain awareness of the need for housing engagement in the adult safeguarding agenda.

Going round the houses: how can health and social housing sector professionals forge better links and what might the benefits be?

YAXLEY Njoki
2015

This booklet by the Clore Social Leadership Programme identifies key emerging trends that are impacting on social housing and health professionals. These are: a shift from health care provision in the hospital setting to the home; an increasing need for caseworkers to know more about navigating both health and social housing systems than their clients; the rise of people with long-term complex multi-faceted problems including physical and mental health issues; introspective performance management targets which make driving collaboration increasingly difficult on the frontline; and funding cuts impacting on both sectors – but an acute awareness that the client should still be centre stage. The paper suggests a need to widen the networks of frontline social housing professionals with health sector counterparts in order to increase efficiency and productivity in both sectors and provide people with better levels of care at home.

Unleashing the power of digital communications: revolutionising housing with care with life enhancing technologies

ROGAN Ali
2015

This paper looks at how technology can be used to help deliver good housing, care and support. It summarises the results from an online survey and workshop held with the South West Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network) leadership. It looks at what can be achieved when technology is implemented well and the looks at the challenges, barriers to adoption and ways to overcome the barriers. Four main barriers to the deployment of technology emerged from the workshop: culture; awareness; leadership, commissioning and procurement; and budgets. Suggestions put forward to help break down these barriers include: adopting a phased introduction of new ways of working; adopt a range of flexible funding options; good communication with stakeholders which involves them in the process early on; and using technology as one part of an integrated approach. Some case study examples are also presented as a bulleted list.

All our futures: housing for ageing

HOUSING AND AGEING ALLIANCE
2015

This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

The Care Act 2014 and its statutory guidance: briefing for the housing support sector

FOUNDATIONS
2015

This briefing summarises the implications of the Care Act and its statutory guidance for commissioners and providers of Home Improvement Agency services in England in relation to housing and adaptations. It looks particularly at the role of housing related services to help in preventing or delaying demand for larger packages of care and support and help in integrating the whole system. Sections cover: prevention; advice and information; integration; assessments and eligibility criteria.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people

DAVIES Alissa
2015

Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Results 11 - 20 of 22

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