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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 21 - 30 of 33

Unleashing the power of digital communications: revolutionising housing with care with life enhancing technologies

ROGAN Ali
2015

This paper looks at how technology can be used to help deliver good housing, care and support. It summarises the results from an online survey and workshop held with the South West Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network) leadership. It looks at what can be achieved when technology is implemented well and the looks at the challenges, barriers to adoption and ways to overcome the barriers. Four main barriers to the deployment of technology emerged from the workshop: culture; awareness; leadership, commissioning and procurement; and budgets. Suggestions put forward to help break down these barriers include: adopting a phased introduction of new ways of working; adopt a range of flexible funding options; good communication with stakeholders which involves them in the process early on; and using technology as one part of an integrated approach. Some case study examples are also presented as a bulleted list.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

All our futures: housing for ageing

HOUSING AND AGEING ALLIANCE
2015

This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry
2015

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS
2015

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

The prevention revolution: transforming health and social care

ACEVO. Taskforce on Prevention in Health
2013

This report sets out a number of recommendations aimed at shifting focus and investment towards the provision of integrated, preventative care and support. It looks at three key areas: changing the culture and practices at the local level; changing national-level frameworks and incentives; and the role of long-term investment in driving transformation. The report calls for a ‘prevention revolution’, in which preventative support, advice and treatment is fully integrated into all stages of the care pathway, with the aim of addressing the wider determinants of ill-health, supporting people to manage long-term conditions more effectively, and providing treatment and support in community settings wherever possible, reducing the need for treatment in acute settings. Throughout the report, there is an emphasis on the role played by voluntary organisations in: providing preventative, holistic care in community settings; fostering innovation; strengthening patient engagement; and catalysing cultural change.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people

DAVIES Alissa
2015

Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

MDT development: working toward an effective multidisciplinary/multiagency team

NHS ENGLAND
2015

One of three handbooks to support commissioners, GP practices and community health and care professionals in planning and providing personalised care for people living with long term conditions. The handbook brings together information about multi-disciplinary and integrated teams and looks at the types of teams that need to be in place to deliver integrated healthcare. It provides definitions of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams and also sets out a tool, the MDT Continuum, that describes different types of care team functioning. Four models or stages of multidisciplinary teams are presented, ranging from from unidisciplinary to transdisciplinary team working. Good practice examples representing each of the stages or models. The final section provide information to help integrated commissioning. Other handbooks published separately cover risk stratification and case finding and personalised care and support planning.

Results 21 - 30 of 33

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